Agriculture

Vagabond

Senior Member
Hi there... I'm translating something into English and just want to confirm something, to make sure I won't be getting beaten up :D

My impression is that in English, agriculture = cultivation of the land and animal breeding. Random British and American sources kind of confirm this, but I'd like to be sure... if you saw something like "agriculture-related activities" only to find out that pig farming is included, for instance, would it seem fine to you, or would you be coming after me in a homicidal mood?:D

(In my native tongue, Greek, agriculture translates as γεωργία, which does not include animal breeding, so yeah, you could say I am confused beyond belief...)

Thanks for any advice.
 
  • Parbr1

    Senior Member
    Canada and English
    Hi Vagabond

    I do believe that agriculture is an all-embracing term & can certainly refer to farming of crops and rearing livestock. Thereafter there are sub-sections.
    But I do believe that, for example, the British equivalent of what could be termed "the Department of Agriculture" does deal with problems and issues of both plants and animals.
    I'm also sure that the Common Agricultural Policy of Europe (of which Greece is a member) deals with both animal and crop/plant farming matters...
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi there... I'm translating something into English and just want to confirm something, to make sure I won't be getting beaten up :D

    My impression is that in English, agriculture = cultivation of the land and animal breeding. Random British and American sources kind of confirm this, but I'd like to be sure... if you saw something like "agriculture-related activities" only to find out that pig farming is included, for instance, would it seem fine to you, or would you be coming after me in a homicidal mood?:D

    (In my native tongue, Greek, agriculture translates as γεωργία, which does not include animal breeding, so yeah, you could say I am confused beyond belief...)

    Thanks for any advice.
    I'm no farmer so don't take my word for it but if I were to read "agriculture-related activities", I might think that it includes animal farming simply because it says "agriculture-related" which I take to mean farming (which usually includes animals). If I were to see a reference to "agriculture" only, I would not think that animals were included in the definition.
     

    Vagabond

    Senior Member
    Thank you for the quick replies; the plot thickens :D

    To give you an idea, what I'm working on is statistics. They list numbers and turnovers of all small businesses in Greece, in a specific year, classified by industry. So, if you saw something like "Agriculture, hunting and forestry", would you assume animal breeding to be included in agriculture?

    By the way, I did find a very similar project translated into English, quite obviously by a Greek person as well, and they went for "Agriculture, animal husbandry, hunting and forestry"; I can't say I have found any original English texts going down that road though. My hunch is "animal husbandry" is redundant, but then again, I am no native... :(
     

    lablady

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I'm not a farmer either, but agriculture is one of the main sources of income in our area. I am certain that our local college's Agricultural Department teaches classes in the raising of both plants and animals. I am also certain that the US Department of Agriculture oversees the production of food, whether it is of plant or animal origin.

    If you used the word "agriculture" in our area, we would have no trouble accepting the inclusion of pig farming, or the farming of other animals or animal products (such as milk and egg production). We probably would assume animals were included unless you specified you were speaking only of plants. :)
     

    Parbr1

    Senior Member
    Canada and English
    Hello again
    In response to Vagabond's mention of "animal husbandry" - this is most exclusively related to animals.
    But husbandry on its own is just another term for "1. farming, 2 a management of resources b careful management" (according to my trusty old Concise Oxford Dictionary)
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Where do you find agriculture except in Iowa, midwestern USA? Agriculture is not so much in the eye of the beholder as in what the eye is able to behold. The "family farm" has a broad measure of animals and crops however most of those farms are one crop such as hog farmers or dairy farmers. The larger farms up to a 640 section are disposed to a single corn or soybean and the family farmstead has been razed in favor of plowing under a few more acres. The self sufficient farmstead --family farm-
    may keep a team of horses, raise 40 or 80 acres of flax, keep honey bees, have a herd of 20 goats, a few ducks, even rabbits and a barn full of feral behaving cats. All of the extras are nostalgia.

    The midwest was settled by a mixture of ethnic peoples who knew about self-sufficient agriculture. Here is the way I wrote it, describing such a Scandinavian style of agriculture.

    “They live out in the country,” Grandma Berte told her grandsons.
    In that era, nobody bragged that they lived on a farm. Somehow, saying the phrase "on the farm" had a ring to the ear of cowshit. We are going to visit my sisters out in the country while Uncle Spencer goes to the banks ," Grandma Johnson spoke to Harry and Sammy Batt.
    Out in the country was butter churning, home made bread, and dangling apples on orchard trees. It had the ambiance of splendid hams and crisply roasted chickens on the dinner table to be out in the country.
    Berte Johnson, nee Sigdalstad, cherished the sound of Norwegian and smell of
    Lutherans out in the country. Out in the the country gave the nation that era of first
    generation Norwegian immigrants. They were poor out-of-date rural folk who brought the 16th century to Midwest America. Their manner of talk conversed about the
    visdom of vorking t'a farm, and vashing t'a clothes on a scrub board. They propagated ducks that vaddled. During the late 19th Century, they sent their farm bred children to Norwegian schools because the English schools veren't going to last. According, to their parents Berte and her two sisters were adequately educated by the time they finished the second grade. “Vee doesn’t vant t’em to get stobburn, you see,” said their father.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I thought there was a simple word for the cultivation of plants only or a word for the raising of animals only, but I looked up several words and was disappointed to find that agriculture, farming, husbandry, and ranching all refer to raising both animals and plants. I thought "produce" was just fresh vegetables, but I see that it includes animals too. :(
     
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