aguantar + present participle/gerund

am786706

Member
USA
English
Middle school Spanish teacher here. I am teaching the dis how to complain today. I want to know if it is possible to use aguantar+the present participle to complain. For example....


  • No puedo aguantar trabajando esta pinche escuela.

  • No puedo aguantar haciendo estas malditas tareas.

Obviously, this is a construction that I and my other native English speaking colleagues understand, but we want to know if these sentences sound awkward to native Spanish speakers. Additionally, if you know of any other uses for this verb please share, along with any other ways you might verbalize a complaint. Gracias!

El Señor
 
  • periferica

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi!
    Yes, it sound's awkward.
    It should be:
    No puedo aguantar + verbo en infinitivo
    No puedo aguantar trabajar en esta pinche escuela.
    No puedo aguantar hacer estas malditas tareas.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Middle school Spanish teacher here. I am teaching the dis how to complain today. I want to know if it is possible to use aguantar+the present participle to complain. For example....


    • No puedo aguantar trabajando esta pinche escuela.

    • No puedo aguantar haciendo estas malditas tareas.

    Obviously, this is a construction that I and my other native English speaking colleagues understand, but we want to know if these sentences sound awkward to native Spanish speakers. Additionally, if you know of any other uses for this verb please share, along with any other ways you might verbalize a complaint. Gracias!

    El Señor
    The Spanish gerundio is quite a different thing from the English gerund or present participle.

    After "No puedo aguantar", you need a direct object, so the appropriate form of the verb is the infinitivo.

    In English, infinitives can sometimes act like nouns and gerunds almost always can.

    In Latin, the gerundivm was a verb form used as a noun, but only in "oblique" cases (i.e. either adveribally or as object of a preposition), never as a direct object. In other words, it corresponds, roughly speaking, to the old "a-...in'" form you sometimes hear in English (e.g. "I saw him a-climbin' that tree"). Even native English speakers who still use forms like "a-climbin'" would not use "a-workin'" or "a-doin'" after "I can't bear."
     

    dgaleano

    New Member
    Spanish
    Hi!
    Yes, it sound's awkward.
    It should be:
    No puedo aguantar + verbo en infinitivo
    No puedo aguantar trabajar en esta pinche escuela.
    No puedo aguantar hacer estas malditas tareas.
    I agree with periferica, however there is a more "natural" way (at least for Colombian Spanish :)) of complaining.
    No aguanto trabajar en esta escuela
    No aguanto hacer estas malditas tareas

    Regards.
     

    Llegandoasercolombiano

    New Member
    english - texas
    Otros están de acuerdo con que el verbo aguantar suena mejor sin ser precedido por el verbo poder?

    Otra pregunta con aguantar: he oído la gente de Colombia usar aguantar en esta manera:
    - como está la fiesta? Aguanta (creo que significa que está bien, pero no muy bien)
    - es su novia bonita? Ella aguanta (bonita, pero no muy bonita)

    es común fuera de Colombia, o no?
     

    jmx

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    Otros están de acuerdo con que el verbo aguantar suena mejor sin ser precedido por el verbo poder?
    Sí, y en general en español no usamos "poder" tan a menudo como "can" en inglés.
    Otra pregunta con aguantar: he oído la gente de Colombia usar aguantar en esta manera:
    - como está la fiesta? Aguanta (creo que significa que está bien, pero no muy bien)
    - es su novia bonita? Ella aguanta (bonita, pero no muy bonita)

    es común fuera de Colombia, o no?
    Común no, pero entendible sí, sobre todo en la primera frase.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top