Ah, get out! And wot would ’e be a-doing ’ere?

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by ComicMonster, Nov 9, 2015.

  1. ComicMonster

    ComicMonster Senior Member

    The Earth
    Spanish - Spain
    Hello! I am in trouble with a local cockney sort of parlance.

    We are in a South London pub, the Horn, where Charlie Chaplin used to go as a boy to see some vaudeville routines. Now, in his early thirties and muted into a world star, he revisits the same premises and hears that while drinking a glass of beer:

    "‘That’s ’im. I tell you ’tis.’"
    "‘Ah, get out! And wot would ’e be a-doing ’ere?’"
    He was driven back along Kennington Road towards the bridge…

    I have no way to know exactly what the two locals are saying —then I would still have the trouble of rendering it in a Spanish kind of "slang", but that's another pair of shoes.

    My try (anyway):
    "«Es él. T’igo que es él.»
    «¡Eh, pírate! ¿Qué narices tás haciendo aquí?»"
    Regresó en el taxi por Kennington Road en dirección al puente…

    I am sure you can help me here —don't know whether I am wrong or not—.

    Thanks a lot in advance… :)

    CM
     
  2. BLUEGLAZE

    BLUEGLAZE Senior Member

    English - USA
    Over all, I would say it looks good but you need another native Spanish speaker to twist the Spanish properly.
    On your third line, though, tas refers to you (tú). Should it no be 'ta referring to Chaplin?
     
  3. ComicMonster

    ComicMonster Senior Member

    The Earth
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi, BLUEGAZE, I feel encouraged by your comments. And, yes, the twisting is going to be a bit of a nightmare, but I guess I'll find a way now that I know the idea is correct.

    Concerning "tas", I think it's a question of style. You are right, we can say "ta", referring to Chaplin ("tas" does also refer to him), but then you are supposing the two chaps are addressing the actor in a more formal, even if disrespectful, manner (le estarían hablando de usted —¿Qué narices está [usted] haciendo aquí?) It won't be incorrect, but then you will also have to say "pírese" in the first part. I opted for a "tú" way of speaking because this adds to the coarse talk of the drunkards and helps to give a kind "slang" impression in Spanish (as far as I see, specially here, where there is very little "material" to go jargon, the sentence being quite short…)

    Thanks a lot for your help, BLUEGAZE. :thumbsup:
     
  4. simonitov Senior Member

    Hampshire, UK
    English - British
    "«Es él. T’igo que es él.»
    «¡Eh, pírate! ¿Qué narices estaría él haciendo aquí?»"
    Le llevaron en taxi por Kennington Road en dirección al puente…
     
  5. ComicMonster

    ComicMonster Senior Member

    The Earth
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi simonitov: Ah! Very important precision indeed! "Estaría" means they are supposing, hypothesizing —so the sentence gets less agressive, and that's very well. Thanks really.

    On the contrary, your "Le llevaron el taxi" is more grammatically correct, for sure, but my personal opinion is that it is (nearly) always best to avoid passive voice (or passive sense) in Spanish, since that's alien to our normal way of expressing things. It's quite obvious that he was not driving the taxi himself, so saying that "[él] regresó en taxi" is more natural than "fue llevado" (or "le llevaron"); that sounds a little stiff, or forced. It makes more sense, for example, if someone is "taken" unwillingly (which is not the case), as with police, kidnappers and so on…

    Thanks a lot again, simonitov, you have helped me a lot.

    CM
     
  6. simonitov Senior Member

    Hampshire, UK
    English - British
    You have missed both points. In the first they are talking of "él" 3rd person, not 2nd person (as well as it being conditional). The second is that THEY took HIM, he didn´t just return by himself.
     
  7. ComicMonster

    ComicMonster Senior Member

    The Earth
    Spanish - Spain
    This 3rd person is maintained in my rendering, once corrected with what you said: «¡Eh, pírese! ¿Qué narices táría haciendo aquí?».

    One question in this respect. The "Ah, get out!" is equivalent to "get away from here! (as "pírese")? Depending on the degree of harshness you may be right, since the aggressive undertone would justify the "being taken" —I understand that in the sense of being recommended or even protected in some way to leave the place.

    But I didn't consider the situation to be really threatening —just unsympathetic—: a policeman says a little bit before in the book to Chaplin himself, and referring to a similar situation: "That’s all right, Charlie. These people won’t hurt you. They are the best people in the world. I have been with them for fifteen years".

    That made me thinking that Chaplin himself had decided to get out of the bar and jump into the cab he had left just outside the pub —and for this reason an active tense in Spanish.
     
  8. simonitov Senior Member

    Hampshire, UK
    English - British
    "get out!" o "get off!" es una manera de decir "¡no digas tonterías!", "¡basura!" cuando no estás de acuerdo con lo que dice alguien.
     
  9. ComicMonster

    ComicMonster Senior Member

    The Earth
    Spanish - Spain
    Vale. Eso cambia muchas cosas. Mi error estaba ahí.

    Entiendo que ya no hay una interpelación personal (relativamente) agresiva, en plan: ¡"pírese" o "lárguese"!, sino algo parecido a esto, creo yo:

    "«Es él. T’igo que es él.»
    «¡No digas tonterías! ¿Qué narices táría haciendo aquí?»"

    Y en ese caso, sigo pensando que no tiene sentido decir que "se lo llevaron en taxi".
    Es mucho más lógico el simple "Regresó en el taxi por Kennington Road en dirección al puente…". Fíjate además que se dice: "Regresó en el taxi [porque había venido en él desde un principio]…" —es decir, no hubo nadie que tuviera que buscarle uno para sacarlo en volandas de un sitio peligroso.

    Gracias otra vez.
     
  10. simonitov Senior Member

    Hampshire, UK
    English - British
    Ah, pues vale, si es que llegó en taxi, tiene sentido lo que pones "regresó en el taxi ....". o ¿qué te parece "le llevó el taxista ..."? es que pone "he was driven".
     
  11. Ari RT

    Ari RT Senior Member

    Português - Brasil
    Los dos "locales" se hablan el uno al otro. No veo, en el trecho puesto, evidencia de que hablen a Chaplin en ningún momento.
    Tampoco veo taxi. "He was driven" solo significa que le llevaron. No los "locales", a quiénes no habló. Tal vez um empleado suyo o un amigo, tal vez un taxi, no se sabe.
    He como lo entendí yo:

    Estamos en un pub al que Charlie Chaplin solía ir de niño. Hoy, cambiado en adulto y estrella mundial, el vuelve al mismo sitio y oye la siguiente charla, mientras se toma una cerveza:
    - Es él, se lo digo.
    - !Tontería! Qué haría aqui un tipo como él...
    Chaplin salió del pub y volvió en coche por Kennington rd hacia el puente.

    He lo que pasó, conforme lo veo. Hace falta escribirlo "en jargón".
     
  12. ComicMonster

    ComicMonster Senior Member

    The Earth
    Spanish - Spain
    Ferpecto! Todo está claro. Creo que no hay materia para más disquisiciones. El punto crucial estaba en dirimir (entender en mi caso) eso del "Ah, get out!", que matiza el tono de los dos parroquianos.

    Muchas gracias a todos.
     

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