ai ni iku yo

truepurple

Senior Member
English-US
I try to learn Japanese bit by bit by watching subbed anime. Often its hard to figure out a words meaning since the order of the translation can be different then the source and sometimes the translators get creative with meaning that wasn't there.

But this http://www.animefreak.tv/watch/asobi-ni-iku-yo-episode-6-online at the very end it has a useful part that helps me isolate the meaning of the lines in the song.

"ai ni iku yo", is translated as ""I'll meet up with you" Then part of the phrase is echoed "iku yo" which the translator says means "I'll meet". Which means "ai ni" roughly means "with you" in Japanese.

I found this thread searching stuff to confirm my interpretation, and found a number of translated titles with "ai ni" in the untranslated, and "with you" in the translation. So "wo" must mean love since "ai ni" means "with you" I am familiar with the other ways of saying love here, "diaski" one way which I can't bring to mind at the moment, and the one I found in my searches that's apparently almost never used, none of which is "wo" so I am a bit confused. Which is ironic considering woo has a english meaning that is related to love.

Maybe its like the english word schoshe, which is like the japanese word eschoshe,(might be getting one or both words slightly wrong and probably misspelling them) since it comes from that word. (apparently someone who wasn't that great at japanese made it popular enough to get it into the english language. Both words mean "a little bit". Never mind, I just looked it up, etymology of the word has nothing to do with Chinese or Japanese. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=woo

Mod note:
Branched from this thread
Capitalisation and other standard writing conventions must be enforced
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Shiratori99

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    I try to learn japanese bit by bit by watching subbed anime. Often its hard to figure out a words meaning since the order of the translation can be different then the source and sometimes the translators get creative with meaning that wasn't there.

    But this http://www.animefreak.tv/watch/asobi-ni-iku-yo-episode-6-online at the very end it has a useful part that helps me isolate the meaning of the lines in the song.

    "ai ni iku yo", is translated as ""I'll meet up with you" Then part of the phrase is echoed "iku yo" which the translator says means "I'll meet". Which means "ai ni" roughly means "with you" in japanese.

    I found this thread searching stuff to confirm my interpretation, and found a number of translated titles with "ai ni" in the untranslated, and "with you" in the translation. So "wo" must mean love since "ai ni" means "with you" I am familiar with the other ways of saying love here, "diaski" one way which I can't bring to mind at the moment, and the one I found in my searches that's apparently almost never used, none of which is "wo" so I am a bit confused. Which is ironic considering woo has a english meaning that is related to love.

    Maybe its like the english word schoshe, which is like the japanese word eschoshe,(might be getting one or both words slightly wrong and probably misspelling them) since it comes from that word. (apparently someone who wasn't that great at japanese made it popular enough to get it into the english language. Both words mean "a little bit". Never mind, I just looked it up, etymology of the word has nothing to do with chinese or japanese. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=woo
    "Ai" = meeting
    "ni" = to
    "iku" = to go
    "yo" = indicates an exclamation

    I'm not sure what you mean with "schoshe".

    Also Japanese grammar is very different from English, so you can't really guess the meaning of a spoken word in a sentence by looking at the subtitles :p
     
    Last edited:

    truepurple

    Senior Member
    English-US
    The translation clearly says with you, are you saying the translation is wrong?

    Also Japanese grammar is very different from English
    I am well aware that the asian languages have little in common with western languages.

    you can't really guess the meaning of a spoken word in a sentence by looking at the subtitles
    Overall that isn't true. Much of the time it is true, but sometimes translations are such that a meaning is isolated enough that you you can pick it up, especially if it is used frequently.

    I know the words for god, monster, human, awesome!, thankyou, sorry, very sorry, cute, afraid (though still working on not getting these two mixed up), friends/comrades, certainly, cat, but, "in addition"(or something like that), little bit (aka esckoshi that I mentioned earlier) welcome home, hurry, very long time/eternity, everyone/people, what? (just inverses of previous), onomatopoeia for heart beat, stupid, 2 variants on like/love, two for perverted, and probably others too that I can't think of at the moment. I don't have them all down to the point where I can easily bring them to mind and say them properly, but enough that I often recognize them when watching the anime, and knowing these words helps me isolate the meaning of other words too. And I learned all of them by watching subbed animes.
     
    Last edited:

    Shiratori99

    Senior Member
    German - Germany
    The translation clearly says with you, are you saying the translation is wrong?
    Ai can have multiple meanings, but in the phrase you quoted above it means "meeting". However, "ai ni" as an isolated phrase definitely does not mean "with you".
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    The unmentioned object of au (from which a verbal noun ai is derived) here is "you" because it is the only contextually relevant candidate. When ai ni iku appears in other contexts, you have to figure out the best among candidates suitable for the context.
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    Hi. Hajimemasihe.
    "ai ni iku yo", is translated as ""I'll meet up with you" Then part of the phrase is echoed "iku yo" which the translator says means "I'll meet". Which means "ai ni" roughly means "with you" in japanese.
    "ai ni iku yo" when it's said in conversation the subject is dropped because it's obviously the speaker himself, and also the object is dropped because it's obviously the person the speaker is talking to. As Shiratori99 is saying 'ai ni' means to meet, 'iku' means to go, 'yo' is just a little particle to show friendliness.

    So "wo" must mean love since "ai ni" means "with you"
    The phrase "wo ai ni" is Chinese.
    "wo" doesn't mean anything in Japanese. (It's how we type を, and in ancient time it was the way to pronounce を but now the pronunciation is just the same as お.)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top