aim a kick

  • Silver_Biscuit

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    You can't really aim a kick/blow without going through with the action, so I'd say it means that you tried to kick/hit them at least. It doesn't say whether you succeeded - you may have missed. In fact I'd think generally it implies that you did miss, since if you succeeded we'd probably just use "I hit/kicked"
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I think there are cases where it is still a successful blow or kick and this language is used to indicate the intentional strategy involved in the move, but I agree that it's more common to encounter it when the attempt failed.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I think you could also find "aimed a kick" used to mean - made a kicking motion in the direction of a person, but well out of range to actually hit them or even have expected there to be a possibility.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I think you could also find "aimed a kick" used to mean - made a kicking motion in the direction of a person, but well out of range to actually hit them or even have expected there to be a possibility.
    Sorry I don't understnad what you meant by the part in bold.
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I meant you might be so far away, that there is no way that you thought you could have struck the person.

    My cat was meowing from the top of the cat tree down the hallway. I aimed a kick at her out of exasperation.

    I am twenty feet or more from the cat, and she's also six feet off the ground. I didn't expect there to be a possibility I would hit her with my aimed kick. Instead, I was sure I would entirely miss. And in fact she might not even notice. It was just an expression of my irritation at her meowing.
     
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