Aim High

Antonio

Senior Member
Mexico/Spanish
Hi Group,

What does "Aim High" and "Aim Low" mean? and I have an example "You know Jess, that if you aim higher, to can do better job and get promoted right away".
 
  • garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    'Aim high' = 'Have better aspirations', 'Want to do as well as you can', 'Be intent on climbing the professional ladder', etc. 'Aim low' = 'to fail to aim high (enough)'.
     

    atlantaguy33

    Member
    USA English
    When you "aim high" you set larger or harder to achieve goals-- you challenge yourself.
    And to "aim low" is the opposite--set smaller or easier goals. I believe it was a slogan for the US Air Force, alon g the same idea as "be all that you can be."

    In your sentence, if Jess challenges himself more he will perform better and advance quicker. It implies that Jess is currently not trying very hard.
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    I'm gonna make a few corrections to each sentence, to know, if I'm right making these corrections and to understand the full usage of the word "aim"

    "The aim (objective or goal) of the campaign is to get as much support as possible"

    "To aim (point) for something"

    "The talks are aiming (pointing for a compromise) at a compromise"

    "The government's campaign is aimed (oriented or pointed to influence...) at influencing public opinion"

    "She aimed for the world record" (blank)
    "These advertisements are specifically aimed (oriented or pointed) at young people"

    If I'm right or wrong, please let me know.
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes.
    Another word you can use is target, targeting and targeted.

    A target, as a noun, is one of those things that is a circle with smaller circles in alternating colors--usually black and white, or red and white--with a dot in the middle that is called a bullseye.

    Targets can also be other things, such as moving ducks in a shooting gallery, a target language is the language that an ESL language hopes her students learn; a target, in essence, is la meta--and is the goal that you aim for!
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Antonio said:
    I'm gonna make a few corrections to each sentence, to know, if I'm right making these corrections and to understand the full usage of the word "aim"

    "The aim (objective or goal) of the campaign is to get as much support as possible"

    "To aim (point) for something"

    "The talks are aiming (pointing for a compromise) at a compromise"

    "The government's campaign is aimed (oriented or pointed to influence...) at influencing public opinion"

    "She aimed for the world record" (blank)
    "These advertisements are specifically aimed (oriented or pointed) at young people"

    If I'm right or wrong, please let me know.
    All good, Antonio.
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    In wrestling, we say "aim high, shoot low", referring to having high goals, but then having nice low shots.

    Note: Shots in wrestling are particular types of moves designed to gain control over your opponent, as opposed to throws.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio said:
    I'm gonna make a few corrections to each sentence, to know, if I'm right making these corrections and to understand the full usage of the word "aim"

    "The aim (objective or goal) of the campaign is to get as much support as possible"

    "To aim (point) for something"

    "The talks are aiming (pointing for a compromise) at a compromise"

    "The government's campaign is aimed (oriented or pointed to influence...) at influencing public opinion"

    "She aimed for the world record" (blank)
    "These advertisements are specifically aimed (oriented or pointed) at young people"

    If I'm right or wrong, please let me know.
    Hey Antonio;

    I concur with lsp..all of these are perfect!! Good going!!
    You can also 'aim' at something with a weapon...'The Hunter took aim at the Deer.'...'the Hunter aimed at the Bear.'...

    te gato;)
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    I left one in blank, because I don't know, what this sentence mean:

    "She aimed for the world record"

    What does "aim" mean in these particular sentences or contexts?
    I have other questions about the meanings of this following sentences:

    "I aim to be a millionaire by the time I'm 35"

    "We are aiming for a 50% share of the German market"

    "My main aim in life is to be a good husband and father"

    "Our short-term aim is to deal with our current financial difficulties,
    but our long-term aim is to improve the company's profitability"

    "The leaflet has been produced with the aim of increasing public awareness of the disease"
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio said:
    I left one in blank, because I don't know, what this sentence mean:

    "She aimed for the world record"she has set her goals for a world record..She wants a world record...(future)

    What does "aim" mean in these particular sentences or contexts?
    I have other questions about the meanings of this following sentences:

    "I aim to be a millionaire by the time I'm 35"Same as above..you want to be a millionaire by the age of 35

    "We are aiming for a 50% share of the German market"The want 50% of the German market..

    "My main aim in life is to be a good husband and father"You want to be a good husband and father..that is what you are going to try to do...

    "Our short-term aim is to deal with our current financial difficulties, they want to fix the financial problems..
    but our long-term aim is to improve the company's profitability"Same..they want to be profitable in the future..

    "The leaflet has been produced with the aim of increasing public awareness of the disease"The leaflet was made in hopes that people would become aware of the disease...they want the public to become aware...
    Hey Antonio;
    I explained..In blue..I like using different colors..:D I hope this helps..
    te gato;)
     

    JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    Antonio said:
    In English "Target" and "Objective" mean the same thing or not?
    No. A target is what you aim at, at as shooting range. It could also be the one a sniper is shooting at. Ex: You only have one shot to hit the target, or that man with the sunglasses is your target. An objective is usually a goal, for example:
    The objective of this mission is to resucue the hostages.
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    To target your audience, market, campaign, consumer needs, etc what does all these phrases mean? In this case, is different then objective or not?

    on the other hand, this sentence, I don't fully understand it "Our key aim is to be the first choice packing machinery for our custumers...." What does "aim" mean in this particular sentence?
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio said:
    To target your audience, market, campaign, consumer needs, etc what does all these phrases mean? In this case, is different then objective or not?

    on the other hand, this sentence, I don't fully understand it "Our key aim is to be the first choice packing machinery for our custumers...." What does "aim" mean in this particular sentence?
    Hey Antonio;
    You can target people..and not shoot them!!:eek:
    When you target something or someone...you are trying to figure out what they want..'We are targeting all the 16 year old girls to see if they like this pink color.'
    'Our key aim is to...' is just saying what they want to do..'We want to be the first choice packing....'

    te gato;)
     

    Antonio

    Senior Member
    Mexico/Spanish
    Thank you te gato, but is not at all clear my first question, I hope you or someone please, help me out on this first question that confuses me a lot:

    "To target your audience, market, campaign, consumer needs, etc what does all these phrases mean? In this case, is different then objective or not"?
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Antonio said:
    Thank you te gato, but is not at all clear my first question, I hope you or someone please, help me out on this first question that confuses me a lot:

    "To target your audience, market, campaign, consumer needs, etc what does all these phrases mean? In this case, is different then objective or not"?
    First of al I am guessing that these are different phrases..
    Lets say that you have a great new brand of runners...
    your target audience..is who would like your runners (age, where they live)
    your target market...is where your runners would sell the best (big city, small town)
    your target campaign...is how you are going to get people to buy your runners..(newspaper ads, radio or TV ads)
    target consumers needs..you are trying to figure out if this is what the consumer needs and will buy...(surveys, questionnaires)
    The main objective is to sell your runners....

    te gato;)
     

    renrah

    Member
    USA - English
    To target a marketing campaign means to tailor it to the needs, wants, likes and dislikes of the consumer. You identify the relevant traits of the consumer in order to sell most effectively to them. You want to make sure that the person you wish to sell to sees your marketing and is reflected in it. This will make them want to purchase your product.

    Does this make it clear to you?
     
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