aim + to/for?

rukulu

New Member
Italian
Hi to everybody!
This is my first thread, I hope to present my doubts properly.

I'm reviewing a technical report, and I've some problems with this sentence:

Many projects also aimed their awareness strategies younger individuals.

It seems to me that something is missing, like an to/at or for following the verb aim. What do you think?

Thanks for the help!
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Welcome to the forum, rukulu. You have presented your doubts very nicely.

    You are correct that something is missing before "younger." I would guess "at."
     

    rukulu

    New Member
    Italian
    okay, thanks a lot Florentia!

    I thought the same, but I was wondering if the verb "aim" could be transitive in some cases.

    Again, thank you for the prompt reply!
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    But "aim" is transitive in your example. It has a direct object, namely "their awareness strategies".
    Compare this with "I aimed my gun at the target." My gun is the direct object of the transitive verb aim.
    It can't have two direct objects: you can't say "I aimed my gun the target".

    Aim can also be intransitive, but when it is, it's usually really transitive with an implied object: He raised his gun, aimed, and fired.
     

    rukulu

    New Member
    Italian
    I understand Edinburgher, I guess I didn't explain myself correctly. Of course "aim" has a direct object, I was doubting if it could have another meaning without needing a particle/preposition for the receiver of the action. As in the case: "Fabio gave me a book".
    Probably I'm just crazy...eheheheh

    Thanks anyway, I really appreciate it!
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Not crazy. Fabio gave the book to me. Fabio gave me the book. "The book" is the direct object, "me" or "to me" is the indirect object. You can have two objects if one is direct (accusative) and the other is indirect (dative).
     

    rukulu

    New Member
    Italian
    Exactly, that was what I was doubting about the verb "aim". In fact, in my sentence "their awareness strategies" is the direct object, while "younger individuals" is the indirect object. But I assume that "aim" wants always the preposition for the indirect object.

    Thanks a lot!
     

    Adezga

    Senior Member
    Spanish- Spain
    Hello!

    This is an old thread but I have the same doubt. What is the correct preposition in this sentence?

    Webquest aimed to / for /at sixth-grade students of Geography.


    Thank you!
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Can you give more context? What is "Webquest"? Is it a product? Then it should be "Webquest is aimed ..."
    Otherwise you seem to have quoted an incomplete sentence.

    But only "at" works here.
     

    Hans in Texas

    Senior Member
    US English
    In AE, “aim to” + verb sounds like imitation Wild West talk: I aim to round up these cattle before sundown.
    “Aim at” + noun/pronoun means the object is the literal target for a shot: He aimed at the buffalo but shot his guide instead.
    “Aim for” + noun/pronoun implies a goal: Politicians aim for 100%, but they are pleased to get 51%.
     

    Adezga

    Senior Member
    Spanish- Spain
    Can you give more context? What is "Webquest"? Is it a product? Then it should be "Webquest is aimed ..."
    Otherwise you seem to have quoted an incomplete sentence.

    But only "at" works here.
    A WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web. These can be created using various programs, including a simple word processing document that includes links to websites.
    This is an example:

    WebQuest

    So, the sentence is a kind of introduction (Webquest aimed to / for /at sixth-grade students of Geography)
     

    Adezga

    Senior Member
    Spanish- Spain
    Thank you.

    Yesterday, my teacher told me that in my sentence "aimed" is not completely correct. According to him, "target" suits better.

    So, I will have a go:

    This WebQuest is targeted for sixth-grade students of Geography.

    Better now?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    No. With "targeted" you also need "at".

    I wouldn't say "targeted at" is necessarily better than "aimed at". They're both OK, and I think I prefer "aimed".
     

    Adezga

    Senior Member
    Spanish- Spain
    This WebQuest is aimed at sixth-grade students of Geography.

    Does it sound good? I really appreciate your help

    What about this sentence appearing as a way of title page?

    Webquest aimed at sixth-grade students of Geography.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You could just use “for” instead of “aimed at” — as in the title in the link you’ve provided: “A WebQuest for 3rd Grade VMBO (English)”.
     
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