Ain’t a mouse alive’d pass up bologna

Discussion in 'English Only' started by jacdac, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. jacdac

    jacdac Senior Member

    Lebanese
    ‘Don’t bother,’ Dean said. ‘What do you mean?’ Toot-Toot asked.
    Ain’t a mouse alive’d pass up bologna if he could get it. You a crazy guy!’
    Source: The Green Mile by Stephen King

    Ain’t = is’t and ‘d = would, right?

    ‘Isn’t a mouse alive would pass up’ something sounds like dialect. How would you say it in colloquial English?

    Thank you.
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    There isn't a mouse alive that would pass up bologna if he could get it.

    Ain't = Isn't.
    I see "alive'd" as "alive who'd" without the "who" portion (or "that'd" instead of "who'd")
     
  3. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    There isn't a mouse alive that would pass up bologna. 'There' is just omitted because it's an unstressed function word at the beginning of the sentence; that's normal in casual speech. The relative clause marker 'that' is sometimes omitted (casually or in dialect) after a clause with existential 'there' or 'it'.
     
  4. jacdac

    jacdac Senior Member

    Lebanese
    Thank you.
     

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