Air in the glass (of wine)

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ngoduytung1998

Senior Member
Vietnamese - Vietnam
In the film Rope (1948) by Hitchcock, Brandon says to Kenneth who is holding a glass of wine: "There's too much air in your glass".
Kenneth replies: "Mine's fine, thanks" (he refuses to be poured some more wine or to be given other glass of wine, I'm not sure).
In this context, does he mean "there are too much gases in your glass" or "there's two much space/too little drink in your glass"?
Thanks in advance!
 
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  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "there's too much space/too little drink in your glass"?
    Exactly.

    In any case, "too much air" in a drink could never mean "too many bubbles of gas". There's too much gas in this beer, or too many bubbles in this lemonade are possibilities.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the film Rope (1948) by Hitchcock, Brandon says to Kenneth who is holding a glass of wine: "There's too much air in your glass".
    Kenneth replies: "Mine's fine, thanks" (he refuses to be poured some more wine or to be given other glass of wine, I'm not sure).
    In this context, does he mean "there are too much gases in your glass" or "there's two much space/too little drink in your glass"?
    Thank you for the additional context. I suppose that it is a witticism referring to both of these possible interpretations. I am not sure I have seen the film though.
     

    ngoduytung1998

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese - Vietnam
    Thanks all of you for helping me. I think I'll go for the meaning "there's too little drink in his glass".
    I'm doing a translation of this film. Very good film I must say, though it has nothing to do with this thread.
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    Thanks all of you for helping me. I think I'll go for the meaning "there's too little drink in his glass".
    I'm doing a translation of this film. Very good film I must say, though it has nothing to do with this thread.
    I've seen the movie. This is definitely the right interpretation. It's the type of witty phrasing characteristic of movies from the '20s to the '40s.
     
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