aishiteru, aishite iru, aishite imasu

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donjoe

Member
Romanian
I've seen a few variations of the "aishiteru" way of saying "I love (you)" and I was wondering what subtle differences there may be between them:
- plain "aishiteru"
- "aishite iru"
- "aishite imasu".

Also, it would be helpful if someone could explain (or link to an explanation of) the construction of "aishite" - is it true it's based on "ai" = "harmony"? Does it then mean something like "make-harmony-with (someone)" or am I completely off-track here, interpreting "-shite" as having anything to do with "shimasu"?

Thanks.
 
  • almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    - plain "aishiteru".....sounds like a dialogue in a soap opera.
    - "aishite iru" .....not conversational, most likely in a textbook.
    - "aishite imasu" .....a polite way of "aishite iru".

    You can ommit "i" in a conversation like aishiteru or aishitemasu.

    If you're an adult and visiting Japan to tell somebody you like "I love you",
    aishite imasu or aishitemasu is most suitable.


    "ai" = "harmony"???....I think you mean 合う(au) as in:
    This bikini suits me.(このビキニは私に合う or 合います(aimasu)

    "shite" is an imperative form of suru as in "kore o shite(Do this)".

    Therefore aishite means love me.
     

    donjoe

    Member
    Romanian
    If you're an adult and visiting Japan to tell somebody you like "I love you", aishite imasu or aishitemasu is most suitable.
    ... But still not as suitable or realistically-intimate as "suki da yo", right?

    "ai" = "harmony"???
    Told you I could be completely off-track here. I was thinking it may be the "ai" from "ai+ki+do" that I'd seen in a translation somewhere. It sure looks as though you used the same kanji in your examples as there is in "aikido", so I must have something right here - the core concept has to be common.


    LE:
    Ah, I have it now, there's a good explanation of "ai" here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aikido#Etymology_and_basic_philosophy
    ... So I was indeed off-track, as "ai" is not "harmony" but "joining", "combining", "uniting". Then the etymological meaning of "ai+shite" would be something like "unite with me!".
     
    Last edited:

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    ~But still not as suitable or realistically-intimate as "suki da yo", right?~

    Yes, you can say that when you know her/him very well and already get along with her/him.

    But if you don't know her/him very well and you like her so much, want to tell her "I love you", then aishitemasu is more polite and suitable.

    ai+ki+do=合気道
     

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    ~Then the etymological meaning of "ai+shite" would be something like "unite with me!".~

    That's an interesting theory but:
    Ai=愛=love

    Then I'm not an etymologist. Maybe moderator could elaborate on Ai etymologically.
     
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