al volo

  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    belfastgirl said:
    Can someone please tell me what this means in English.

    TIA

    Belfastgirl :)


    Hi and welcome to the forum Belfastgirl!!!

    Could you please provide some context?? A sentence, maybe??

    Look, "volo" is flight, but I think what you have there is an idiom or a phrase. That's why a sentence could be helpful!!

    Thx, Art :) ;) :p
     

    belfastgirl

    New Member
    UK English
    That is all I have I'm afraid - it is printed on the inside of some very special coffee cups someone has bought us for an anniversary present whilst they were in Bergamo.

    Hope this helps
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    L'ho preso al volo = I took it in a hurry (rush, or in a flash)

    Ho preso la palla al volo = I made a flying catch

    L'ho capito al volo = I grasped it at once, I caught on to it at once, I took the hint, I got it at once
     

    TiffanyC

    Member
    United States / English
    Wouldn't "on the fly" mean something different? "On the fly" usually means to do something spontaneous, not to quickly understand something.

    "On the fly, he decided to go to Rome."

    True, it is usually a quick decision though.

    ______

    "On the fly" significa una frase diversa, no? "On the fly" di solito vuol dire fare qualcosa spontanea, non vuol dire capire velocemente.

    "On the fly, he decided to go to Rome"

    Vero, è di solito una delibera velocemente.
     

    Polpo_D

    Senior Member
    English ϟ USA
    Just to Follow up with what TiffanyC was saying.
    In US-English, "on the fly" can mean 1. "on the go" but it has the additional meaning of 2. impromptu (improvvisato), i.e. done without planning.

    Impronta is defined as "on the fly" according to this definition. impronta - Dizionario italiano-inglese WordReference

    I'm curious if "Al volo" can also be used in this way. Although both phrases seem to refer to flight there only seems to be a partial overlap in meaning.




     

    King Crimson

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Just to Follow up with what TiffanyC was saying.
    In US-English, "on the fly" can mean 1. "on the go" but it has the additional meaning of 2. impromptu (improvvisato), i.e. done without planning.

    Impronta is defined as "on the fly" according to this definition. impronta - Dizionario italiano-inglese WordReference

    I'm curious if "Al volo" can also be used in this way. Although both phrases seem to refer to flight there only seems to be a partial overlap in meaning.




    I see what you mean Polpo, 'al volo' can have a literal meaning (for example: "La cosa più pazza che abbia mai fatto? Sono sceso dall'autobus al volo" = "The craziest thing I've ever done? I jumped off the bus on the go" or the second example in post #4) and a figurative meaning (see last example in post #4).
    When, however, we want to mean 'done without planning', I think we would use one of the expressions mentioned in post #8 (for example 'su due piedi') rather than 'al volo', which, to me, emphasizes swiftness of action, rather than the planning aspect.
    This is not black and white, however, it is true that there may be a partial overlap. For example in a sentence like 'Quando ho deciso di sposarmi l'ho deciso così, su due piedi', I might consider replacing 'su due piedi' with 'al volo'.
     

    Polpo_D

    Senior Member
    English ϟ USA
    I see what you mean Polpo, 'al volo' can have a literal meaning (for example: "La cosa più pazza che abbia mai fatto? Sono sceso dall'autobus al volo" = "The craziest thing I've ever done? I jumped off the bus on the go" or the second example in post #4) and a figurative meaning (see last example in post #4).
    When, however, we want to mean 'done without planning', I think we would use one of the expressions mentioned in post #8 (for example 'su due piedi') rather than 'al volo', which, to me, emphasizes swiftness of action, rather than the planning aspect.
    This is not black and white, however, it is true that there may be a partial overlap. For example in a sentence like 'Quando ho deciso di sposarmi l'ho deciso così, su due piedi', I might consider replacing 'su due piedi' with 'al volo'.

    Grazie KC, è più chiaro adesso.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Ciao KC, small point, but I don't think you'd say "I jumped off the bus on the go" but rather "I jumped off a bus while it was moving" or "I jumped off a moving bus". On the go does mean moving but used differently. I ate lunch on the go would imply eating quickly while moving around, between appointments perhaps or while doing something else. Does al volo fit in this example?
     
    Last edited:

    King Crimson

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Ok, thanks, I had a different understanding of 'on the go' and, based on your clarification, I would say that 'al volo' could fit in the quick lunch case, for example 'Avevo un sacco di appuntamenti e ho mangiato un panino al volo'.;)
     

    Polpo_D

    Senior Member
    English ϟ USA
    For further clarification,

    "on the go/fly" always refers directly to the subject of the verb, not the object.

    So "I jumped off the bus on the go". "on the go" corresponds to "I" not the "bus"
    It would mean "I was on the go, while jumping off the bus" instead of, I jumped off a moving bus.

    You'd have to be quite a busy person to use that phrase
     
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