Alborozo

Magmod

Banned
England English
alborozo
(Del ár. hisp. alburúz, y este del ár. clás. burūz, parada militar previa a una expedición).

:arrow: Does anybody know the Arabic origin of the Spanish word?

burūz, parada militar previa a una expedición = military parade previous to an expedition.

Regards :)
 
  • cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    alborozo
    (Delár. hisp. alburúz, y este delár. clás. burūz, parada militar previa a una expedición).

    :arrow: Does anybody know the Arabic origin of the Spanish word?

    burūz, parada militar previa a una expedición = military parade previous to an expedition.

    Regards :)
    The Arabic word that you've given is البروز , pronounced as in the transliteration, but the "z" is like the English "z" not the Castillan one.
    The word burúz (or buruuz) has several meaning, all about the different connotations of prominence, going out, appearing ....

    Strange though, that my Spanish-Arabic dictionary gives alborozo several meanings, all about happiness,felicity (!) but no mention to expeditions or any such thing (!)

    P.S. Even my monolingual Spanish dictionary (el pequeño Larousse) gives this :
    Alborozo s.m. (ár. burûz, salir a recibir a alguien pomposamente). Sentimiento intenso de alegría. 2. Manifestación ruidosa de ese sentimiento.
    Where did you find this "military" definition ?
     

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    Where did you find this "military" definition ?
    Thank you Cherine for your interesting answer :thumbsup:

    :arrow: You will find the military definition in
    http://www.rae.es/ with alborozo. Perhaps it is part of the wars in Spain.

    The word I started with was Alboroto = racket; disturbance which is common in Spanish.
    Obviously I thought it might be of Arabic origin.
    But the rea dictionary made it difficult to find the origin:
    Alboroto > alborotar > alborozar > alborozo
    Your dictionary gave the answer straightaway.
    Regards :)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    I think the semantic progression in Spanish was parade --> racket --> party --> joy. :)
     

    zooz

    Senior Member
    Arabic & Syrian Arabic
    Further to my previous post, I was wondering whether Mubaarazah = dual could be the military connotation, as may had been used by the Moors.
    Regards :)
    I presume you meant duel which corresponds your word مُبارزة. Yes, this word definitely comes from the Standard Arabic, and it's still used in many dialects. In the old history, this action was a tradation just before the beginning of the battle as a valor sign which demonstrates the fighting skills of the knights and warriors. Of course it involved other issues as well.
     

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    I presume you meant duel :tick: which corresponds your word مُبارزة.:tick: Yes, this word definitely comes from the Standard Arabic, and it's still used in many dialects. In the old history, this action was a tradition just before the beginning of the battle as a valor sign which demonstrates the fighting skills of the knights and warriors. Of course it involved other issues as well.
    Thanks Zooz for your explanation which now makes more sense of the word Alborozo i.e. especially the parade :)
     

    ronanpoirier

    Senior Member
    Brazil - Portuguese
    Only to add something, in Portuguese we have the word "alvoroço" which means "lots of sound". Example: when girls see their favorite singer and they to scream out loud like crazy ones, that's a "alvoroço". If your president says he/she is gonna give up of being president, all the newspapers will say something about it so it's a "alvoroço" too. My dictionary says: alvoroço = dusturbation, agitation.

    I hope it helps.
     

    Magmod

    Banned
    England English
    Only to add something, in Portuguese we have the word "alvoroço" which means "lots of sound". Example: when girls see their favorite singer and they to scream out loud like crazy ones, that's a "alvoroço". If your president says he/she is gonna give up of being president, all the newspapers will say something about it so it's a "alvoroço" too. My dictionary says: alvoroço = dusturbation, agitation.
    I hope it helps :tick: :thumbsup:
    As I explained above the common Spanish word alboroto originates from alborozo, something like this:
    Alboroto > alborotar > alborozar > alborozo

    Your probably common Portuguese word might translate to alboroto, see WR dictionary, as follows:
    alboroto m
    1 (jaleo) racket
    2 (disturbios) disturbance, uproar

    I wish to know how the word became alboroto from alborozo :)
     
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