Alemannic: einewäg, änewäg

berndf

Moderator
German (Germany)
#1
Hello,

does anyone know the etymology of the Allemanic word einewäg or änewäg? It means anyway. I am particularly curious, if the similarity to anyway is accidental or if the is a demonstrable etymological relationship.

Thank you,
Bernd
 
  • GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    #4
    The Alemannic Wikipedia has the similarity down as Zuefall? ("coincidence?") in its word relationship table.

    The Etymological Online Dictionary gives it as one of several compounds starting with any-, along with analogous forms in other Germanic languages and dialects:
    O.E. ænig "any, anyone," lit. "one-y," from P.Gmc. *ainagas (cf. O.S. enig, O.N. einigr, O.Fris. enich, Du. enig, Ger. einig). The -y may have dim. force here (...) Combinations anywise, anyone, anything date back to O.E.; anywhere is from c.1300; anybody 1490; anyway 1570 (but anyways, with adverbial genitive, is from 1560)...
    Considering the etymology of way/wise/-wäg, they seem to be cognate, berndf. I had thought it one of those words that is closer to Old English and the Northern Germanic languages than it is to modern-day German (well, it's a totally different word in Germany), like gumpe/gumpä (Al.), jump (Eng.), springen (Ger.), among others.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    #5
    The Alemannic Wikipedia has the similarity down as Zuefall? ("coincidence?") in its word relationship table.
    I was stuck with that. That's why I asked. :)

    So, GEmatt, I interpret your anwer as suggesting that einewäg, änewäg and anyway are most likely true cognates though the evidence remains circumstancial. Right?
     

    GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    #6
    I interpret your anwer as suggesting that einewäg, änewäg and anyway are most likely true cognates though the evidence remains circumstancial. Right?
    That's my amateur opinion;). I'd be very interested to see more posts and input on this, though.

    I remember coming across a more complete table of words detailing the similarities between Alemannic words and Old English and Northern Germanic words, similarities which were lost when German "shifted" closer to its present form. I just can't remember where I saw it:(...
     

    GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    #8
    Does the part "äne" of the word änewäg mean "any" in Allemanic too? I find it quite interesting to see the similarities between the continental German dialects and modern English.
    My gut reaction: no. But there are several dialects of Alemannic, avok. You might find the distinctions on Wikipedia interesting ("Low", "High" and "Highest", plus Swabian), and you will guess that the more distant the regions, the greater the variations in usage and pronunciation, so my "no" is only likely to be accurate for the variant of Alemannic I'm familiar with.

    Would you like to provide a sample sentence with "any"? Then perhaps I or a better speaker can have a crack at giving you a comparison.

    Robocop? Are you there?:)
     
    #9
    My gut reaction: no. But there are several dialects of Alemannic, avok. You might find the distinctions on Wikipedia interesting ("Low", "High" and "Highest", plus Swabian), and you will guess that the more distant the regions, the greater the variations in usage and pronunciation, so my "no" is only likely to be accurate for the variant of Alemannic I'm familiar with.

    Would you like to provide a sample sentence with "any"? Then perhaps I or a better speaker can have a crack at giving you a comparison.

    Robocop? Are you there?:)
    Hi GEmatt sorry but is this question for me?
    If it is, I mean "any" sentence where you can use the word "any" :)
     

    GEmatt

    Senior Member
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    #10
    Hi GEmatt sorry but is this question for me?
    If it is, I mean "any" sentence where you can use the word "any" :)
    Yes, it was for you:).

    Don't take this as definitive, but my impression is that "any" in the sense of inquiring as to availability ("Do you have any tea?") is not much used. Translated, I would tend to just say "Have you tea?", in Swiss German.

    Other uses of "any", for example expressing indifference/ambivalence, are basically the same as the words used in Standard German, with the difference mainly down to pronunciation.

    I put "any" into dict.leo.org to see what translations it gives. "Beliebig", "irgend-" and "jed-" are the most common, and these are also used in the Alemannic that I speak, so no similarities, there. I speak it fluently, having (mostly) grown up near Zurich, but it is not my mother tongue - so like I said, it would be instructive to have native input on this.

    GEmatt
     
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