algo (pronunciation)

TheCrociato91

Senior Member
Italian - Northern Italy
It doesn't sound like a stop sound to me, rather like an approximant. But let's wait to see what Amapolas says.

The same phoneme in a similar environment, such as in the word "doggo" (not "dog" because here the /g/ is word-final) would be way more pronounced in English, like a true stop [g] sound.
 
  • Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It doesn't sound like a stop sound to me, rather like an approximant. But let's wait to see what Amapolas says.

    The same phoneme in a similar environment, such as in the word "doggo" (not "dog" because here the /g/ is word-final) would be way more pronounced in English, like a true stop [g] sound.
    I hear [ɢ], not [g] or [ɣ] or [ɰ]. So it is a stop, but not like "g" in English "doggo", "Lego", or "Algol".
     

    Frisian

    Banned
    English - America
    It's weird because English Wiktionary gives [paˈɣaɾ] while Spanish Wiktionary gives [paˈɰaɾ] for pagar (to pay). I guess English speakers perceive it as a voiced velar fricative while native Spanish speakers perceive it as a voiced velar approximant.
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    I finally got to listen to that pleitecas file (I was clicking on "pleitecas" and not on the little triangle!) and what I hear is something in between the /g/ and the /ɣ / sounds. Not exactly like the English /g/. :confused:
    And which is the sound used by the Málvarez in algo que sucede?
    It's similar to the sound described above as pronounced in Galicia, akin to the sound of the Spanish letter J. There's a little map showing Málvarez is from Asturias, close to Galicia, so there's likely some relation.
    I don't perceive a difference between [paˈɣaɾ] and [paˈɰaɾ] either
    I've listened to a couple of audios of ɰ and it sounds to me as though it's articulated a bit more to the back and a bit more open than ɣ.
    If Duvija were around she'd surely have some great explanations.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (US Northeast)
    I finally got to listen to that pleitecas file (I was clicking on "pleitecas" and not on the little triangle!) and what I hear is something in between the /g/ and the /ɣ / sounds. Not exactly like the English /g/. :confused:
    It's similar to the sound described above as pronounced in Galicia, akin to the sound of the Spanish letter J. There's a little map showing Málvarez is from Asturias, close to Galicia, so there's likely some relation.
    I've listened to a couple of audios of ɰ and it sounds to me as though it's articulated a bit more to the back and a bit more open than ɣ.
    If Duvija were around she'd surely have some great explanations.
    Thanks for the explanations, Amapolas. You'd make a good detective.
    Ok, so ɰ is further back. I can see that now, a bit closer to French r
     

    Rashit

    Banned
    Russian
    Thanks for the explanations, Amapolas. You'd make a good detective.
    Ok, so ɰ is further back. I can see that now, a bit closer to French r
    Actually, ɰ and ɣ have the same place of articulation. They are both voiced, too. The only difference is in the manner of articulation: the former is an approximant while the latter is a fricative.
    ʁ (the French r), on the other hand, is different from ɣ only in its place of articulation: the former is uvular while the latter is velar.
     
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