Alias Given Name or Middle Name

cfu507

Senior Member
Hebrew
Hello,
When I was born my parents gave me only one name, let's say Jessica.
When I was 18 I went to the Ministry of the Interior and added another name in my I.D., let's say that the secondary name is CFU.

I'm filling a form. I have two fields and I don’t know where to write CFU (my secondary name).
Is CFU a Middle Name or Alias Given Name?

If it makes any difference for your answer, I don't use my secondary name. It is just written in my I.D. Most of my freinds don't even know that I have it.

Thank you for your help
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Suppose a girl is named "Lucia" by her family. To this she adds "Sue", and calls herself "Lucia Sue". Sue is a middle name. She then becomes a singer in a girl group, and adopts the stage name "Lush Spice". "Lush Spice" is an alias.

    Does that help?
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Suppose a girl is named "Lucia" by her family. To this she adds "Sue", and calls herself "Lucia Sue". Sue is a middle name. She then becomes a singer in a girl group, and adopts the stage name "Lush Spice". "Lush Spice" is an alias.

    Does that help?
    So, if when pepole ask me "what is your name" my answer is always only Jessica (in my example), then CFU is not a middle name but alias name in my I.D.
    Right?
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    I want to ask it again. Sorry for being pedant here. It is very important for me not to make any mistake.

    I'm taking GWB's example. Is Sue a middle name because it is written in this girl's ID?
    If Sue is written in her ID but she doesn’t use this name. Everyone call her Lucia and she has never mentioned the name Sue. Would it still be her middle name?
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Everyone call her Lucia and she has never mentioned the name Sue. Would it still be her middle name?
    Many people have middle names that appear on their birth certificates or baptismal records, but which they do not ordinarily use, even as initials. Nevertheless, they still can refer to these as "middle names".
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    It is advisable to avoid the word alias unless talking about criminals. An artiste, singer or whatever, has a stage name or is "also known as..." often abbreviated to aka. An author has a "nom de plume" or penname. Or you say, "goes under the name of..." whether talking of a criminal or not. And in recent years we have had "The artist earlier known as Prince", I think it was.
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Thank you Arrius
    Well, in the form there were two fields:
    1. Middle Name
    2. Alias Given Name /Additional Given Name

    Three questions:
    1) If I was a criminal and I was known in my neighborhood as "the hammer". Would it be an Alias Given Name /Additional Given Name?

    2) Also, I have an Argentinean friend. Her family call here Malina, but this name is not written in her ID, the only name in her ID is an Israeli name. In this case, is the name Melina an Alias Given Name/Additional Given Name?

    3) Is there a difference between Alias and Additional name?
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    It is advisable to avoid the word alias unless talking about criminals. An artiste, singer or whatever, has a stage name or is "also known as..." often abbreviated to aka. An author has a "nom de plume" or penname. Or you say, "goes under the name of..." whether talking of a criminal or not. And in recent years we have had "The artist earlier known as Prince", I think it was.
    I agree, but would like to note that government and genealogical forms appear to use "alias" in such a way that it would cover a stage name. I wasn't aware of this usage until this thread, but Google searches for "alias given name" and "alias surname" turned up many references to "alias" used by genealogists and used in government documents other than police documents.
     

    Arrius

    Senior Member
    English, UK
    I expect officialese now does the same in the UK, mplsray. There is also the phrase "(under an) assumed name", which I think points even more likely to a crook than alias does.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top