All dialects: جدع - جذع

  • Haroon

    Senior Member
    Arabic-Egypt
    either " the salt of earth" or simply " or just people ( especially men or youngmen) depending on the context. it is the plural of جدع which is a nice guy or just a man.
     
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    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In Palestinian Arabic, a جدع (interestingly enough, pronounced as in Egyptian - "gada3") is a man who is worthy of respect. Usually this is because he is dependable or self-sufficient. We don't use it to mean "nice guy," and certainly not just to mean "man."
     

    djara

    Senior Member
    Tunisia Arabic
    From Ahmad Fouad Najm's poem الجدع جدع والجبان جبان I understand the word to mean brave.
    In Tunisian Arabic "gda3" only refers to physical strength. We write it with a qaf with 3 dots.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In Egypt it has different meanings according to context.

    - A gada3 can mean just a man:
    كان عايز إيه الجدع ده = what did that guy want?
    شايف الجدع اللي ماشي هناك ده = do you see that guy walking there?

    - A gada3 can be a very good man, someone reliable and trustworthy:
    دا راجل جدع جدًا = he's a very good/reliable/trustworthy.... man

    We even have the feminine form :) :
    دي بنت جدعة جدًا = a girl who's relibale, serviable, helpful....

    But the f. form doesn't have the meaning of "just a girl".

    There's a new song by أحمد مكي called جدعان طيبين maybe it can give you an idea of what a gada3 is. :)
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    Yes, I like this word also, Andrew.

    Someone can correct me if I am wrong, but I believe a جدع is more than just someone who is reliable and trustworthy, but also refers someone who is an all around principled person, filled with virtue and integrity (in Egyptian usage anyway).

    I wanted to mention that if you want to tell someone to "be a man" (or maybe more slangily to "man up" or in cowboy jargon to "cowboy up"), that is to say to possess the qualities of a جدع, you can say خليك جدع. Sometimes the appropriate translation may be something other than "be a man". For example:

    خليك جدع وافتح لها الباب.

    Be a gentleman and open the door for her.
     
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    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    You're right, Josh. But the thing is that this word can mean different degrees of gentlemanship/manhood/nobility... if I may express it this way.
    For example, sometimes it's used along with the word شهم like saying that a man is a really راجل شهم وجدع (and "shahm" is another word that I find difficult to translate).
    The verb اتجدعن (etgad3an/edgad3an) usually means make an effort, but strong, rather than "be a man" (although it sometimes does).
    The noun الجدعنة elgad3ana is sometimes a synonym of الشهامة and also الرجولة like real manhood (i.e. not just being a "male" but a real man).

    It's a really interesting word, and more interesting and awesome meaning. :)
     

    djamal 2008

    Senior Member
    arabic
    الشهامة Would be translated best by the word magnanimity wich combines all the virtues of generosity, nobility and greatness of the spirit and mind.

    But, Khelik Gada3 could well be interpreted as an insult as if one lacks courage and kindness.
     

    scetis

    Senior Member
    English- Canadian
    [Moderator's Note: Merged with a previous thread]
    I always though جدع meant hardworking in Egyptian Arabic but lately friends have been saying it's not... جدع seems to be more along the lines of diligent which could be in any area of life... would that be right?

    But more importantly, I'm still stuck with not knowing how to say someone is hardworking... so if anyone knows a better term that would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks...
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Someone who is جدع is dependable, trustworthy, knows how to manage different situations, resourceful. And maybe other characteristics as well.

    A hardworking person is شغيل shagh-ghiil, shaaTer fe shoghlo شاطر في شغله . And we also have the expression حمار شغل , the feminine is حمارة شغل but I'm not sure you can use it with everyone.
     

    momai

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Syria
    [Moderator's Note: Split from here]
    [...]
    - قدعان Egyptian loanword I guess
    [...]
     
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    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    Why are you spelling it as قدع/قدعان and not جدع/جدعان? I believe it's the same as جذع from Classical Arabic and other dialects, but with the usual shift of the interdental to a stop.
     

    momai

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Syria
    Why are you spelling it as قدع/قدعان and not جدع/جدعان? I believe it's the same as جذع from Classical Arabic and other dialects, but with the usual shift of the interdental to a stop.
    I copy pasted it. I myself don't spell it with qaaf. I think it is an Egyption loanword in SA because it is pronounced with g not with jeem.
     
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    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    Why are you spelling it as قدع/قدعان and not جدع/جدعان? I believe it's the same as جذع from Classical Arabic and other dialects, but with the usual shift of the interdental to a stop.
    I just assumed this is correct because the word with the closest meaning is قدع, the other two don't seem to make sense compared to the current usage.
     

    Schem

    Senior Member
    Najdi Arabic
    Not to veer further off-topic but the word جذع djeð3 and the diminutive جذيع edjðē3 are still often used in my dialect to refer to young and able-bodied individuals. The relation to the Egyptian usage is rather clear in this instance.
     

    Wadi Hanifa

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    I just assumed this is correct because the word with the closest meaning is قدع, the other two don't seem to make sense compared to the current usage.
    Hi Maha. As you know the [g] in Egyptian Arabic corresponds to جيم not ق, so it can'be قدع.

    Not to veer further off-topic but the word جذع djeð3 and the diminutive جذيع edjðē3 are still often used in my dialect to refer to young and able-bodied individuals. The relation to the Egyptian usage is rather clear in this instance.
    Yes exactly.
     
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