All dialects: future markers غاد ، باش ، ح ، راح

Nikola

Senior Member
English - American
Which countries use which,to say you will eat?

غادتاكل ,حتاكل,راحتاكل,باش تاكل​
 
  • Tariq_Ibn_zyad

    Senior Member
    French,arabic(moroccan,algerian)
    In Morocco we use "ghâdi"
    you will eat= ghadi takoul

    In Algeria we use "ra-(h)* râye7"
    *(construction to express te verb "to be":rani,raki,raki,rah,raha(i),rana..etc)
    you will eat= rak raye7 takoul
    nb:in the west,"ghadi" as in Morocco

    In Tunisia we use "bêsh"
    you will eat: besh takoul
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Also Iraq,Syria,Jordan and Lebanon.
    I think in Syria they also use "7a." I wonder if there are different contexts in which one or the other is preferred, or it if's regional, or if they're just completely interchangeable.
     

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    I think in Syria they also use "7a." I wonder if there are different contexts in which one or the other is preferred, or it if's regional, or if they're just completely interchangeable.
    These are all used, I will have to leave it to someone else to explain the subtleties ح، رح، ب، ببقي
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    These are all used, I will have to leave it to someone else to explain the subtleties ح، رح، ب، ببقي
    This post might interest you. I explained some of the differences from a Palestinian-Arabic perspective. I did not discuss ح because we do not use it.
     

    Nikola

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I appreciate it everybody. Ayed and Tariq are the forms you gave the only forms, or is there anything like what Elroy says:
    All but ح are.

    رح أحكي معاه - I am going to speak to him. (whether it was my decision or not, that's what's going to happen.)
    عم بحكي معاه - I am speaking to him. (right now)
    بكرة بحكي معاه - I'll speak to him tomorrow. (notice that when the present tense is used with a future meaning the time is usually specified. This form is used to indicate a decision that is being made at the time of speaking.)
    ببقى بحكي معاه - I'll (eventually) talk/get around to talking to him (at some point). (this also indicates a decision made at the time of speaking, but indicates that the speaker is not certain exactly when he plans to do whatever it is he just decided to do.)

    As for ح as I said we don't use but I'm pretty sure it functions like رح. But you should wait for confirmation from Syrians.

    I hope that helps. The subtleties aren't always so easy to explain so you probably have further questions. If so, please don't hesitate to ask them.
     

    Tariq_Ibn_zyad

    Senior Member
    French,arabic(moroccan,algerian)
    I appreciate it everybody. Ayed and Tariq are the forms you gave the only forms, or is there anything like what Elroy says:
    Well if you want me to be more precise that's not a problem:)

    In Standard Morrocan( I say standard because southern and eastern Moroccan use different constructions,we generally call standard the dialect from Rabat/Casablanca which is the most influent)

    nahdar m3ah= I speak to him( all the time)
    kanahdar m3ah= I am speaking to him
    ghadi nahdar m3ah(or ghanahdar m3ah)= I 'm going to speak to him

    But you can use the present tense with a future meaning eg:
    ghedda nahdar m3ah=tomorrow I'm going to speak to him

    Standard Algerian(same thing,this is globally Algiers dialect.Western(Oran) and eastern(Constantine) are quite different)

    nahdar m3ah= I speak to him(all the time)
    rani nahdar m3ah= I am speaking to him
    rani raye7 nahdar m3ah= I'm going to speak to him

    and same thing:
    ghedwa nahdar m3ah= Tomorrow I'm going to speak to him

    I'm not sure about Tunisian so I won't say anything;)
     

    SofiaB

    Senior Member
    English Asia
    In Yemen we hear عدand ش . Is the sh reated to classical sa and sawfa سـ and سوف? Do any other places use these?
     

    Josh_

    Senior Member
    U.S., English
    It's interesting that in the dialects so many ways to express the future tense have arisen. One thing I was wondering today is how they originated; if perhaps they had origins in MSA, which I imagine many, if not all, do. I'd be interested in hearing your thoughts.

    Here are my thoughts:

    راح and رح and other variants
    This one is pretty straight forward and does not warrant much discussion. The basic meaning of this word is 'to go.' The connection to the future is self explanatory -- going to do something.

    ح and ه
    I used to think that the ح was fairly unusual/unique, when compared with MSA anyway, and developed independently some how, but then the thought occurred to me that it may have originally come from راح with all but the last letter being lost.

    ه, I'm fairly confident, developed out of ح, perhaps because it is an easier sound to produce.

    Personal note: I have been accustomed to using ح, as it was the way I learned the future tense in Egyptian, but due to my stuttering problem I will also use ه if I am having difficulty speaking and it would be easier to produce.

    غاد (or is it غادي or غدي?)
    My thought on this is that it comes from the MSA root غ-د-ي which has meanings related to 'going or coming (in the morning)' and is used (more modernly) to mean 'become'. This root, as we know, is where the MSA word for tomorrow (غدا) comes from. So we can extrapolate and see the connection with the future.

    This is all I have so far. The other ones I am not sure about.

    I responded to this discussion as I did not think my question warranted its own separate thread, but it can be moved if deemed appropriate.
     
    Last edited:

    clevermizo

    Senior Member
    English (USA), Spanish
    I think in Syria they also use "7a." I wonder if there are different contexts in which one or the other is preferred, or it if's regional, or if they're just completely interchangeable.
    There are 5 basic variants of the future prefix in Syrian I know of (I don't know what their regional distribution is):

    ra7, ra7a, la7, la7a, 7a
    رح ، رحا، لح، لحا، حـ

    Also, I believe you can use the present tense with future intent (bukra, bruu7 ma3o 3a-l-maT3am).

    As I am not a native speaker, I just picked one, so I always use ra7 رح.
     

    djara

    Senior Member
    Tunisia Arabic
    Tunisian Arabic, "baash" and "tawwa":
    Tomorrow I will meet him = ghudwa (baash) nqaablu.
    I'll let you know = taww(a) nqullik
    I will not leave my home = maa-neesh baash nkhalli daari
    I'm going to show you = taww(a) nwarreek

    Although I don't think I'd misuse one for the other, I can't see the rule that makes me opt for one rather than the other.
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    In bedouin 7ejazi, same as Najdi/khaliji: "ba" so "I will go" becomes "baru7".
    In Moroccan, as Tariq said, it's "ghadi/gha", but in my area (Fès) we use more "gha", it comes from "ghadara/yughadiru" in MSA which means "to go". So "I will go" becomes "gha/ghadi namchi".
     

    djara

    Senior Member
    Tunisia Arabic
    In bedouin 7ejazi, same as Najdi/khaliji: "ba" so "I will go" becomes "baru7".
    In Moroccan, as Tariq said, it's "ghadi/gha", but in my area (Fès) we use more "gha", it comes from "ghadara/yughadiru" in MSA which means "to go". So "I will go" becomes "gha/ghadi namchi".
    Are you sure that غادر يغادر "ghadara/yughadiru" (to leave) is the root for غا and غادي. I thought the root was غدا يغدو which has also given غدا (tomorrow)
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Are you sure that غادر يغادر "ghadara/yughadiru" (to leave) is the root for غا and غادي. I thought the root was غدا يغدو which has also given غدا (tomorrow)
    That's what I red once, but I can't quote the source, it was a while ago.
     

    fenakhay

    Member
    French (France) / Arabic (Morocco)
    In my Moroccan dialect, we say : ماشي (to walk) and ما (short for mashi)

    Mashi yaqraw = ماشي يقروا. (They will study/read)

    Ma yaqraw = ما يقروا. (They will study/read)

    Also in some Northern dialects, they make use of : La-, Ra-
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    In my Moroccan dialect, we say : ماشي (to walk) and ما (short for mashi)

    Mashi yaqraw = ماشي يقروا. (They will study/read)

    Ma yaqraw = ما يقروا. (They will study/read)

    Also in some Northern dialects, they make use of : La-, Ra-
    True although I think this is fading out because of غادي which is erasing ماشي. A lot of people confuse the future marker ماشي with the negative ماشي because they're too used to غادي

    As for ما, recognise that this sounds really confusing :D :D
     

    fenakhay

    Member
    French (France) / Arabic (Morocco)
    True although I think this is fading out because of غادي which is erasing ماشي. A lot of people confuse the future marker ماشي with the negative ماشي because they're too used to غادي
    When talking to other Moroccans, I tend to use ghadi since it is less confusing for them.

    For the negative, we don't make use of mashi. It is still separated in all instance; ma- -shi/shay. So it is not confusing for us as it is for them.

    For example :
    • I am not sick = Manishay mrit. (مانيشي مريض) or Ma mrit shay (ما مريض شي)
    • I will not tell you what he told me = Ma manqullek shay shni qal li (ما مانقولك شي شني قال لي)
    As for ما, recognise that this sounds really confusing :D :D
    Not to me, I am afraid haha.
     
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