All dialects/MSA: bottle

Discussion in 'العربية (Arabic)' started by djara, Jul 3, 2017.

  1. djara

    djara Senior Member

    Sousse, Tunisia
    Tunisia Arabic
    What is your preferred word for bottle in MSA: ... قنينة، زجاجة، قارورة ?
    And what are the words you use in your dialect?
    In Tunisian, the most commonly used word is دبّوزة dabbouza, sometimes pronounced دبّوسة dabbousa.
    I know that in Algerian it is قرعة qar3a and in Egyptian أزازة azaaza. (Please correct these if I'm wrong)
     
  2. Hemza

    Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Hello,

    In Morocco as in Algeria, it is قرعة (qar3a).
    زجاج (zjaaj) is used as well but it only mean "glass" (i.e a glass panel of a window, not the one for drinking) and doesn't necessarily refer to a bottle but we may say قرعة زجاج for a bottle made of glass.

    I don't know if bedouins have a word in Morocco for bottle but they use شكوة and قربة for a kind of goatskin where they store milk/water. I guess all bedouins use those two words across Arab countries.
     
  3. tounsi51 Senior Member

    Dubai
    French-Arabic
    In Tunisia also we use قزاز for broken pieces of glass
     
  4. cherine

    cherine Moderator

    Alexandria, Egypt
    Arabic (Egypt).
    The one used in MSA in Egypt is زجاجة. We use قنينة mostly for alcohool bottles, but it's not that common, we still use زجاجة for that.
    قارورة is mostly used for medicine and perfumes, but again isn't that common anymore.
    So, to sum up: the word mostly used in MSA in Egypt for bottle is زجاجة.
    You're right, but we pronounce it ezaaza إزازة. The plural is azaayez أزايز.

    The word إزاز ezaaz means glass (the material) which is زُجاج is MSA.
     
  5. Golden-Rose

    Golden-Rose Member

    English - UK
    In Syrian قنينة, pronounced 2niiné.
    You use the same word for "bottle" and "courgette"? :confused:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 3, 2017
  6. analeeh Senior Member

    English - UK
    Pronounced 2anniine, not 2niine.
     
  7. tounsi51 Senior Member

    Dubai
    French-Arabic
    They pronounce with qaf for bottle and g for courgette
     
  8. Hemza

    Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    True although some people may call both "qar3a" but the context helps to distinguish of course, like in French, you have vers, verre, vert pronounced the same way but people know which word is used.
     
  9. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Chicago, IL
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In Palestine:

    قنينة in colloquial
    زجاجة in MSA
     
  10. djara

    djara Senior Member

    Sousse, Tunisia
    Tunisia Arabic
    I think it makes sense. It is the same word. There is a type of long-shaped pumpkin not a courgette that is cored (emptied) and properly dried and then used as a sort of bottle for drinking.
    Edit: According to etymonline, the English word calabash has a possible similar etymology
    calabash (n.) [​IMG]
    1590s, "dried, hollowed gourd used as a drinking cup," from Spanish calabaza, possibly from Arabic qar'a yabisa "dry gourd," from Persian kharabuz, used of various large melons; or from a pre-Roman Iberian *calapaccia.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2017
  11. Hemza

    Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Which probably gave "calebasse" in French, and serve for the same purpose of drinking :).
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2017
  12. :thumbsup:...and to this day ,very few "traditional" people still use it to preserve certain medicinal herbs against humidity as far as i know .
    ps : we call that long-shaped pumpkin السلاوي
     
  13. djara

    djara Senior Member

    Sousse, Tunisia
    Tunisia Arabic
    Thank you all for your contributions.
     
  14. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    Arabic and English
    Just to add a couple.
    In Iraq it's بُطُل, Arabised from the English bottle.
    I've heard غرشة used in the U.A.E., but I don't know it's origin.
     
  15. Golden-Rose

    Golden-Rose Member

    English - UK
    And I thought that Iraqi guy was purposefully using English to accomodate me :oops:
     
  16. Hemza

    Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    You mean that bottles didn't exist in Iraq or there was no word for them before Gertrude Bell came? No way, it seems impossible. May be an Arabic word used to be used or a Persian word like شيشة ? What elder people say?
     
  17. Ihsiin

    Ihsiin Senior Member

    England
    English
    Of course there were words for 'bottle' before. New words are not borrowed into languages only when no word already existed. Many times new words are imported into languages, sometimes replacing perfectly fine pre-existing words, sometimes going on alongside them. It's just the way of things.
     
  18. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    Arabic and English
    :p

    I'm sure there was. Unfortunately, I don't know what it is and I doubt many people do. You see, the British first set foot in Iraq exactly 100 years ago this year. So I doubt anyone is alive to remember. Also, they may have actually borrowed it earlier - it's not like they didn't know England existed!

    It's definitely not شيشة, because that one is used for a jar not a bottle. If I were to make guesses, it could either have been قزازة or قنينة. Or, maybe they used whatever the Turks used (the Persian equivalent is used in a different way as you see).
     
  19. analeeh Senior Member

    English - UK
    The Turks use şişe for bottle, so it probably wasn't that. But presumably there was something used.
     
  20. Hemza

    Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Indeed, I was just being ironic :p.

    I didn't mean someone who was born in one of the Ottoman ولاية :D but may be, someone old enough to know another word? But I guess the English borrowing is used since a long time. I wanted to know if this borrowing was recent or old that's why I asked.

    I see, thanks :).
     
  21. Mahaodeh Senior Member

    Arabic and English
    Well, my mum is 74 and she's used بطل all here life, she doesn't remember what her parents used to say.

    On second thoughts, I may have been mistaken. شيشة is used specifically for a glass or ceramic jar, an earth-ware (made of clay or something similar) jar is still called جرة. So maybe this distinction started around the beginning of the 20th century and prior to that all of them were called شيشة. I'm saying this because I just remembered that a bottle of perfume, in particular, is called شيشة ريحة not بطل ريحة.
     
  22. Hemza

    Hemza Senior Member

    Paris, France
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    So the borrowing isn't recent. I thought it could even be an American borrowing at first and not necessarily a British one.

    I don't think Iraqis here (including you) are old enough to be able to tell us :(.

    الله يطول عمرنا ;)
     
  23. djara

    djara Senior Member

    Sousse, Tunisia
    Tunisia Arabic
    Old songs and dialectal poetry are usually a good repository of extinct vocabulary.
     

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