All dialects: pith / rind (fruit)

clevermizo

Senior Member
English (USA), Spanish
I have a question about the parts of citrus fruits which just occurred to me as I was eating an orange this morning. :D Is the word قشرة used for both the rind (e.g. of an orange) and the pith (the white part inside that is still bitter and largely inedible)? This seems to be what dictionary results are turning up for me. Is there a common way to distinguish between the two? Both فصحى and colloquial responses are welcome. Thanks!
 
  • djara

    Senior Member
    Tunisia Arabic
    In Tunisian, as far as I know, we use a single word قشرة
    When needed we distinguish between القشرة البرّانية and القشرة البيضة
    In Lebanon, I heard the word قشرة (pronounced ishra) for the rind and لب (lib) for the pith
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    I have a question about the parts of citrus fruits which just occurred to me as I was eating an orange this morning. :D Is the word قشرة used for both the rind (e.g. of an orange) and the pith (the white part inside that is still bitter and largely inedible)? This seems to be what dictionary results are turning up for me. Is there a common way to distinguish between the two? Both فصحى and colloquial responses are welcome. Thanks!
    rind = قشرة
    pith= شحم
     

    djara

    Senior Member
    Tunisia Arabic
    لب with a shadda? Wouldn't it refer to the orange part that we actually eat (the "pulp")?
    On its own, the word ends with a sukun, so no shadda. But I suppose when it is followed by the definite article, it sounds like libb-il.
    When I heard the word it was in a video, part of a Lebanese recipe مربى البوصفير (النارنج)) and it was definitely not referring to the part we eat (although in Tunisia some people only remove the rind of oranges and eat the rest, that is pith and pulp).
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    قشرة (qeshra/geshra) is what is in use in Morocco for the external part, I have no idea how the white part is called.

    rind = قشرة
    pith= شحم
    شحم?? This means "meat fat" in Morocco :D. Or can it includes the white part of citrus? But coming to think about it, "fat" is the white part of meat so it's not illogical after all.

    In Lebanon [...] لب (lib) for the pith
    This is how my Egyptian friend calls sunflower seeds.
     
    Last edited:

    Ghabi

    AL/OL/Ar/Zh mod
    Cantonese
    Most interesting, thank you. How would people say, for example (mother telling son who's eating a piece of orange): "Don't remove the pith! It's good for your health!"
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Most interesting, thank you. How would people say, for example (mother telling son who's eating a piece of orange): "Don't remove the pith! It's good for your health!"
    In Morocco, you have a large choice :D :
    You can use ما+فعل+شي or لا+فعل
    As verbs, you have نحّى ,قلع, زوّل, حيّد
    As for "good", you have زين, زوين, مليح.

    لا تقلع القشرة, أراها زينة للصحة

    In the "much more mainstream" dialect (than mine :D ), you may hear ما تزوّلشي القشرة أراها زوينة للصحة

    here, ق is "q" if urban and "g" if rural/bedouin.
     

    Sun-Shine

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Egypt)
    Egyptian:
    متشلش القشرة البيضة اللي جوا عشان /لأنها مفيدة
    don't remove: (ما تشيلش (متشلش (matshelsh)
    good for your health: مفيدة لصحتك or just say مفيدة
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    شحم?? This means "meat fat" in Morocco :D. Or can it includes the white part of citrus? But coming to think about it, "fat" is the white part of meat so it's not illogical after all.
    Hemza, this is in Fusuha
     
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