All dialects: The weather is hot

raful

Senior Member
Hebrew
Hello to you all
How would you say "the weather is hot"? I'm familiar with the Levantine expression الدنيا شوب . Are there other expressions in other colloquial dialects?
 
  • Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Hello,
    Merely صهد (Sahd) in Morocco (that my Palestinian mates haven't understood and still don't understand haha)
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    In Tunisian Arabic we can say دنية سخونة (denia skhoona)
    I thought about سخون too but forgot which word was used along it. Now you say it I think this is also used in Morocco although not for a heat wave. صهد is hotter than سخون
     

    tounsi51

    Senior Member
    French, Tunisian Arabic
    I thought about سخون too but forgot which word was used along it. Now you say it I think this is also used in Morocco although not for a heat wave. صهد is hotter than سخون
    Your صهد is the equivalent of our سخانة
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In Egyptian Arabic, we say الدنيا حَرّ. But when the air itself is hot (like more hot than usual, and you feel the heat in every breath) we use the word SahD صَهْد: eddonya/eddenya SahD, or: في صَهْد.
     

    oopqoo

    Senior Member
    Hebrew - Israel
    What about حمّ elroy? I remember hearing just this word as opposed to شوب but don't remember the construct: whether it was الدنيا حم or الطقس حم or anything else.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    حمّ is used in the Galilee. :thumbsup:

    You can say الدنيا حمّ or just حمّ. I'm not sure about الطقس حمّ.
     

    dakaplo

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I've also heard in Levantine الطقس حامي, though I think شوب is probably more common.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    الطقس حامي
    In my last post, I said I wasn't sure about الطقس حمّ because it sounded weird to me. After I posted, it occurred to me that it was probably الطقس حامي in Galilean. The fact that you've heard it basically confirms this for me.

    (As I've said many times in the forum), my speech is a mix of Galilean and Jerusalem. In this particular case, I say شوب and only know the Galilean variants passively, which is why I wasn't 100% sure about الطقس حامي.
     

    raful

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Thank you all
    Have you ever heard the term: shargi ?
    I heard it from an elderly lady, who came from the rural parts of North Africa. Although she is illiterate she insisted it's not شرقي but شرجي.
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    شرقي is the name of a hot wind coming from the East as its name implies (I think this wind is called this way in Morocco and Algeria). Spaniards call it Sirocco I think. But I can't understand why she would spell it شرجي... No Maghrebi would use such spelling except if you mean "shargi" which is actually the usual pronunciation but it is written شرقي because the ق is pronounced in most part of the Maghreb as a g (القاف البدوي). In North Africa, only Egyptians would transcribe the g sound as ج, usually Maghrebis transcribe it ق or ك
     

    She'lock Holmes

    Senior Member
    Northern Lev. Arabic (mostly Syrian)
    Lebanese/Syrian:
    I am aware of الجو حر, الجو شوب, and الجو سِخِن. I believe شوب is the most common word for this. الطقس sounds a little formal while الدنيا emphasises the weather condition.
     

    raful

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    the ق is pronounced in most part of the Maghreb as a g (القاف البدوي). In North Africa, only Egyptians would transcribe the g sound as ج, usually Maghrebis transcribe it ق or ك
    I didn't know that. I only met Jews who came from NA and they used the regular ق. Is it like the situation in Iraq, in which Jews, Christians and Mousili spoke with qaff (as written here: Iraqi Arabic: pronunciation of qaf ق)? Would a Maghrebi say الدنيا شرقية? الطقس شرقي؟
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    I didn't know that. I only met Jews who came from NA and they used the regular ق. Is it like the situation in Iraq, in which Jews, Christians and Mousili spoke with qaff (as written here: Iraqi Arabic: pronunciation of qaf ق)? Would a Maghrebi say الدنيا شرقية? الطقس شرقي؟
    As Tounsi51 said, no because شرقي is the name of a peculiar hot wind, not any kind of hot temperature.

    The regular ق vs the g is (roughly) an urban (q)/rural-bedouin (g) split. I think the same goes for Iraq. If Jews (for the Maghreb and Iraq) and Christians (for Iraq) "resisted" the bedouin ق, it is because the influence of bedouin tribes who immigrated in both areas is less pregnant in urban places where most of the Jewish and the Christian populations are found and also because they had fewer contact with bedouins compared to Muslims (cases of Baghdad in Iraq and Tripoli in Libya are pretty interesting for that matter). That also ties in with geography: the North of Iraq has been less influenced by bedouins (from Najd) than the Center or the South, the same goes for the Maghreb, cities and coastal areas were less subject to bedouin influences hence their hold to the ق while more or less bedouinised areas (Libya, Mauritania, rural/desert areas of Morocco/Algeria as well as Southern/Northwestern Tunisia, Central/Western/Southern Iraq) tend to use the bedouin ق. I tried to sum up with a lot of approximative statements because it would be too long to talk about this here. I hope it is still understandable though.
     
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