All dialects: Wait! (imperative)

Hemza

Senior Member
French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
Hello,

How do you say "wait" (imperative mood) in your dialect(s)?

In Morocco, I know three expressions (and if any Moroccan/Maghrebi can shed some light on the origin of two of them):
اصبر

تنّى (I think this one comes from تأنى?)
باللاتي (Any link with الآتي? Or too farfetched?)

In Hijazi, I know انتظر is used.
 
  • Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    Thank you all. Seem like we're among the few who do not use استنى (although Moroccans living near the Algerian border probably use it). But I guess both تنّى and استنى come from تأنى then?

    And also طَوِّل بالَك = خَلِّي بالَك طويل = be patient
    A similar expression exists in Morocco which is كبّر بالك.
     
    The average expression used here is اتسنى ..and l think is the only one that clearly conveys the meaning of " wait ! ".
    as for باللاتي we mostly use it to mean "later on " and اصبر is a request for someone's patience ,but this doesn't prevent that both words are sometimes used as variants of the same meaning ,the same way the word شور that means "slow down" amongst bedouins is used to mean " wait " sometimes as well.
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    The average expression used here is اتسنى ..and l think is the only one that clearly conveys the meaning of " wait ! ".
    This pronunciation may be the urban one which tends to pronounce the "ت" as a "تس" that's why we think it looks like a تس while I think it's actually a ت.
    (I've already heard pronounced with a clear ت that's why I make this hypothesis).

    as for باللاتي we mostly use it to mean "later on " and اصبر is a request for someone's patience ,but this doesn't prevent that both words are sometimes used as variants of the same meaning ,the same way
    My parents always used those three expressions interchangeably, but you're right, there may be a distinction.

    the word شور that means "slow down" amongst bedouins is used to mean " wait " sometimes as well.
    The meaning of شور I know has nothing to do with "to wait" but is like الى
    "مشيت شور الدار" I went toward home. Or are you talking about another word?
     
    This pronunciation may be the urban one which tends to pronounce the "ت" as a "تس" that's why we think it looks like a تس while I think it's actually a ت.
    (I've already heard pronounced with a clear ت that's why I make this hypothesis).
    Maybe there are some people who pronounce it this way ,but i've never heard تنى without the س ,when we say اتسنى we actually mean استنى as pronounced by other Arabic dialects as above ,it's just a matter of إقلاب that we can notice in other words,for instance انصت تصنت, اجذب اجبد ,احسب نسحب ect.
    The meaning of شور I know has nothing to do with "to wait" but is like الى
    "مشيت شور الدار" I went toward home. Or are you talking about another word?
    definitely another one ,it is pronounced شَوًر
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    I just remembered another one used in Morocco which is رجى/يرجي (or يراجي?). At least, the imperative is ارجى as it is the only form I heard :D.
     

    fenakhay

    Member
    French (France) / Arabic (Morocco)
    There is also the verb عاين which can also mean "to wait".
    For example :
    - 3ayen khak 7etta yji = Wait till your brother comes.
     

    Hemza

    Senior Member
    French, Mor/Hijz Arabic (heritage)
    There is also the verb عاين which can also mean "to wait".
    For example :
    - 3ayen khak 7etta yji = Wait till your brother comes.
    This sounds really فويسي :D:D (joking).

    Maybe there are some people who pronounce it this way ,but i've never heard تنى without the س ,when we say اتسنى we actually mean استنى as pronounced by other Arabic dialects as above ,it's just a matter of إقلاب that we can notice in other words,for instance انصت تصنت, اجذب اجبد ,احسب نسحب ect.

    definitely another one ,it is pronounced شَوًر
    Thanks :) (sorry for the late reply).
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top