...all I can advise you is to/ you is hold on to/is you to hold on to...

majk10

New Member
Polish - Poland
Hi Everybody,

I wonder if there is any difference between the following sentences and if all of them are correct:

1) As your broker, all I can advise is you hold on to that stock.
2) As your broker, all I can advise you is to hold on to that stock.
3) As your broker, all I can advise is you to hold on to that stock.

I would appreciate any help.
 
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    1 and 2 are OK but 3 breaks the logical sequence.

    1 can be rewritten as (or is really a shortened version of):
    As your broker, all I can advise is that you hold on to that stock.

    2 is fine the way it is, but you have to read it with a slight pause between you and is.
    As your broker, all I can advise you is to hold on to that stock.

    3 needs to be rewritten as something like this:
    As your broker, all I can advise is for you to hold on to that stock.

    One major difference is that in 1 and 3 "advise" is an intransitive verb whereas in 2 it is transitive.

    Cross-posted
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I agree with RedwoodGrove's versions, but I think advise is transitive (direct object is "all") but in 2 it takes an indirect object as well. All three sentences tell what advice is meant to be given, but only 2 tells to whom it is meant to be given.

    I can also read "you advise" in 1 as an imperative, in which case that would not fit:

    As your broker, all I can advise is [this]: (you) hold on to that stock.
     
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