All Indo-Iranian Languages: pickled vegetables

  • marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Hmm, in Marathi is is called लोणचे /loːɳt͡seː/. مربّہ murabbah is also kind of similar but not exactly the same as achaar. I heard some other word too, but I can't recall it right away.
     
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    desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    ^ sandhānā might be the word you're thinking of. It means pickled vegetables/fruits and is therefore the same in meaning as achār. I personally don't say sandhānā so I'm not quite sure if there is any difference in subtlety. This word is used in Hindi and presumably Urdu too. Cognates with the same meaning cited by Turner include: sã̄dhāṇo (Sindhi), saṁdhāna (Old Awadhi), and sãdhāṇũ (Gujarati).
     
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    nikmahesh

    Member
    English, Hindi, Marwari (basic)
    Marwaris have something called lonji as well. I’ve only ever had a sweet version though.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    There are several words for each type of the pickle: mango itself gives numerous, for example, "chhundaa", "kaTkii", etc. For pickle as generic, cannot recall anything right now except for "achaar". "murabbaa" is of course there, but that's preserves, not pickles.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    ^ sandhānā might be the word you're thinking of. It means pickled vegetables/fruits and is therefore the same in meaning as achār. I personally don't say sandhānā so I'm not quite sure if there is any difference in subtlety. This word is used in Hindi and presumably Urdu too. Cognates with the same meaning cited by Turner include: sã̄dhāṇo (Sindhi), saṁdhāna (Old Awadhi), and sãdhāṇũ (Gujarati).
    Hey, thanks so much. I didn't hear this word. I must have read it on the forum before because I can recognize it. I must ask somebody who knows Sindhi.
     

    Alfaaz

    Senior Member
    English
    Apart from aachaar and terms already mentioned above, the following words are also present:
    • کچومر - कचूमर - This word usually appears to be used to refer to Pico de gallo in the subcontinent, but can also refer to aachaar.
    • تُرشی - This is popular in Irani and Afghani cuisines (as well as others, such as Turkish, etc.) and as a result might also be found in areas and languages of Pakistan neighboring/influenced by these cuisines/languages/cultures.
    • مخلّل - This word is often used in Arabic on labels (in addition to English, Urdu, Hindi, Bangla, etc.) of aachaar made by famous Pakistani brands. It obviously isn't very common in colloquial language, but the word is documented here in Urdu Lughat as well.
    • From searching online: Uppinakayi is given as an equivalent in Kannada, orukai/urugai in Tamil, and uragaya in Telagu. Forum members who are familiar with these languages could provide more details and corrections.
     
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