All Nordic languages: lockdown

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kokoro_mo

New Member
Czech
Hello,

with a couple of friends, we're trying to establish a list of expressions that name in respective linguistic communities the current security hygienic "dispositifs". It's pretty evident that the use is rather arbitrary and "improper" from the point of view of the internal sens of the word (in so far as it makes any sens to speak in these terms of an actual spoken language). For instance, in English we call a "lockdown" (not only) the measures aiming to isolate people in their homes, while there is a more specific word for that in French, "confinement". Moreover, in Central European languages, it has become common to use the local equivalents of the word "quarantine" (English), such as karatnén (Hungarian), karanténa (Czech), kwarantanna (Polish) and so forth, while "quarantine" or "quarantaine" have more specific meaning in English or French respectively. This could be developed at length for Japanese, Chinese and so on, I am just trying to illustrate the fact that there's no point to look into dictionary, the reason for me to solicit the help of the native speakers living in the actual social and linguistic context and so forth. Would you please be so kind to explain which word or words are used to name aforementioned realities in Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish or Faroese, namely the "dispositif" of isolation of the population in their homes, the strategy that we see developed (almost) everywhere to fight the spread of the COVID-19 virus? If you add an explanation (hypothesis) of how and why was the particular linguistic convention established, where does the word "come from" and so on, it will be much appreciated.

Thank you very much! Take care,

P.S. I'll be posting a similar thread in different forums to ask the same question for the other languages where we still don't have a proper translation, I hope it won't be considered as double-posting.
 
  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    Just to add a thought here:

    In the US there was a bit of confusion regarding the terminology because it wasn't used "properly" or "carefully" by officials and people in the media. Terms like "lock-down" and "shelter-in-place" actually have pretty severe implications if they're interpreted one way, but aren't nearly as severe if interpreted another way. San Francisco for example used "Shelter-In-Place" whereas New York did not, yet the actual mandates by officials were almost exactly the same (as far as I recall).

    So for anyone who chimes in it's probably well worth explaining how the words are used and what the nuances are.
     

    Svenke

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    Norwegian:
    Two fairly precise terms:
    Hjemmekarantene/Heimekarantene ('home quarantine') is used when people are not sick but have severe restrictions on leaving their home, because they have (or may have) been exposed to risk of infection.
    Hjemmeisolering/Heimeisolering ('home isolation') is used when people are infected but not hospitalized, and are not allowed to leave their home.

    Less precise terms:
    Avstand ('distance') and holde/halde avstand ('keeping distance') are used about the general behaviour of preferably staying at home, keeping two metres or at least one metre away from all but your very closest family, no unnecessary travel, working from home, no groups of more than so-and-so many persons etc. etc.
    What exactly counts as keeping distance has varied according to varying guidelines, and I expect that it will continue to vary.
     

    kokoro_mo

    New Member
    Czech
    Just to add a thought here:

    In the US there was a bit of confusion regarding the terminology because it wasn't used "properly" or "carefully" by officials and people in the media. Terms like "lock-down" and "shelter-in-place" actually have pretty severe implications if they're interpreted one way, but aren't nearly as severe if interpreted another way. San Francisco for example used "Shelter-In-Place" whereas New York did not, yet the actual mandates by officials were almost exactly the same (as far as I recall).

    So for anyone who chimes in it's probably well worth explaining how the words are used and what the nuances are.
    Thank you for this stimulating remark, i definitely note the expression "shelter-in-place" for San Francisco, if you have any other examples of different expressions used in different states of USA, don't hesitate to feed the thread!

    Norwegian:
    Two fairly precise terms:
    Hjemmekarantene/Heimekarantene ('home quarantine') is used when people are not sick but have severe restrictions on leaving their home, because they have (or may have) been exposed to risk of infection.
    Hjemmeisolering/Heimeisolering ('home isolation') is used when people are infected but not hospitalized, and are not allowed to leave their home.

    Less precise terms:
    Avstand ('distance') and holde/halde avstand ('keeping distance') are used about the general behaviour of preferably staying at home, keeping two metres or at least one metre away from all but your very closest family, no unnecessary travel, working from home, no groups of more than so-and-so many persons etc. etc.
    What exactly counts as keeping distance has varied according to varying guidelines, and I expect that it will continue to vary.
    It's noted, thank you so much!
     

    raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    I agree with Mattias: it is important to be aware of which actual measures that are implemented in each country. The restrictions vary between countries, so the same term may be used to describe different measures in different countries.

    Let me just add a couple of Norwegian terms to Svenke's list.

    Even though "hjemmekarantene" (home quarantine) is used in formal contexts, I think most people just say "karantene" (quarantine).

    The measures that Svenke describes are directed at specific groups: those who are infected or exposed to a risk of infection. A more restrictive measures would be a general order to stay at home. This is called "portforbud" (curfew). This kind of measure has not been implemented in Norway, but the term is used in the media to describe conditions in some other countries.

    The term "nedstengning" (shutdown) is mainly used to describe the situation as a whole, not concrete measures directed towards individuals.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    The measures that Svenke describes are directed at specific groups: those who are infected or exposed to a risk of infection. A more restrictive measures would be a general order to stay at home. This is called "portforbud" (curfew). This kind of measure has not been implemented in Norway, but the term is used in the media to describe conditions in some other countries.

    The term "nedstengning" (shutdown) is mainly used to describe the situation as a whole, not concrete measures directed towards individuals.
    I think that this explanation needs a further delimitation of the terms. I would interpret "portforbud" as a general ban on leaving home for everybody, except people with special permission permanently in a period of time or only in certain time of the "day" (24 hours/døgn in Norwegian).
    Applying the term "portforbud" for people in certain situations (infected or suspected of infections) is confusing in my opinion.
     

    raumar

    Senior Member
    Norwegian
    I agree, that was what I meant to say: "isolasjon" and "karantene" is for people in certain situations, "portforbud" is for everybody. I see that I should have expressed myself more clearly. Thanks for the clarification!
     

    bicontinental

    Senior Member
    English (US), Danish, bilingual
    Danish- English

    nedlukning (af landet): lockdown (of a state, a country, a larger area) ....the Danish term is clearly a translation of the English.
    isolation: isolation
    karantæne: quarantine
     
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