All of us are well

RD74

Senior Member
Hello

Can someone please tell me if I am using the indefinite pronoun “tutti” correctly in the following sentences:

[1] Tutti di noi stanno bene.
All of us are well. Or Everyone of us is well.

[2] Tutti stanno bene.
All are well. Or Everyone is well.

[3] Tutti bene.
All are well. Or Everyone is well.


The context of these sentences would be as an answer to someone who has asked me about the health of my family.
I have also listed my translation attempts.

Can “tutti” mean “all of us” or must the indirect object “di noi” be included as in saying “tutti di noi”?


Thank you very much.

Sincerely,

Rich (RD74)


Please put only the ORIGINAL sentence in the title, not your translation attempt, thanks.
How to choose a thread title
 
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  • RD74

    Senior Member
    Hi Tom,

    Thank you for your response.

    I thought that in Italian, the indefinite plural pronoun - "tutti" is always used with a plural verb - thus, I used "stanno". This is different from English where the indefinite pronoun - "everyone" is used with a singular verb.
     

    Tom S. Fox

    Senior Member
    German
    In this case, you should think of tutti as “all,” not “everyone.” In fact, “all” is what you used in your translations above. English and Italian work the same way in this respect: “We are all well.” — “Stiamo tutti bene.”

    EDIT: I just realized that you thought the problem was the number rather than the person. My point was that you have to you the first person plural, because the subject is we.
     

    TheCrociato91

    Senior Member
    Italian - Northern Italy
    Hi @RD74.

    The main issue lies in the fact that the main Italian translation for "All of (us / you / them)" usually does not include any preposition: "Tutti (noi / voi / loro)".

    [1] Tutti di noi stanno bene. :cross:
    - Tutti noi stiamo bene; or (Noi) stiamo tutti bene (or, less frequently, Noi tutti stiamo bene)

    Everyone of us is well.
    - Ognuno di noi sta bene (this is the literal translation, but more often we would use the above-mentioned options).


    [2] Tutti stanno bene. :tick:
    All are well. :tick: Or Everyone is well. :tick:


    [3] Tutti bene. :confused:
    All are well. Or Everyone is well.
    - This looks a lot like the sentence just above. Tutti bene lacks a verb, but it may work as a response to a question like: A) "Come stanno?" B) "Tutti (stanno) bene"; in this case, the verb stanno is implicit.



    Can “tutti” mean “all of us” :tick: or must the indirect object “di noi” be included as in saying “tutti di noi”?
    As @Tom S. Fox noted, tutti can, in some cases, mean "All of us" / "We all", for example in sentences like "Stiamo tutti bene", where the pronoun noi is implicit. If you want to add it, you can say: "Noi stiamo tutti bene", or "Noi tutti stiamo bene" (the latter being less frequently utilized compared to the former).
     
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    RD74

    Senior Member
    HI Tom,

    Yes, now I see about the verb! I guess my brain is not so good today.

    By any chance - do you have any thoughts about including or not including "di noi"

    Thank you very much, Rich
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    1] Tutti di noi stanno bene.
    All of us are well. Or Everyone of us is well.
    As the others have said you say "Stiamo tutti bene" in Italian. But isn't "All of us are" 1st person plural either?
    Would you say
    All of us are well, aren't we?
    or
    All of us are well, aren't they?
     
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