all praise be yours

polybolos

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, everyone.
I have a question concerning the following article, please help:

This following article is about a cantata (a hymn) written by F. Liszt ( 1811-86 ). Liszt set versions of St. Francis’s text to his music.

Liszt’s text is a paraphrase of the original poem; it doesn’t precisely follow the earliest extant versions of St. Francis’s text, and it includes the “Earthly Death” passage that Liszt himself omitted from his cantata setting. Several of the verses he did set to music begin with the same four words, Laudato sie mi signore (“All praise be yours”)— [...]

Question
What does All praise be yours ? It's very difficult that I can't even assume the meaning. Give me suggestions, to poor polybolos, please.
 
  • tewlwolow

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    It's the Latin religious language. The beginning of hymns, precisely. It means that the God (whom the performer addresses) is worthy of all praise (glory).
     

    tewlwolow

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    Well not, of course. The hymns as a genre originally addressed God, but it has obviously changed and you can write the hymn to virtually anyone/anything. More context would be desirable, what follows the said phrase?
     

    polybolos

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    what follows the said phrase?
    #1's sentences are followed by the sentences below:
    although, in Peter Cornelius’s German translation, they appear alternately as Sei hochgelobet, allmächtiger Gott (“Be greatly praised, almighty God”), Sei hochgelobet, heilger Schöpfer (“Be greatly praised, holy Creator”), and so on.
     

    tewlwolow

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    So you have the answer! It's the alternative to be greatly praised, almighty God and be greatly praised, holy Creator.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's the Latin religious language
    Not exactly :). If I remember correctly (and in case this is of interest to anyone:p) this hymn of St Francis was written in a very early form of Italian; one of the earliest examples of written Italian that have been found.
     

    tewlwolow

    Senior Member
    Polish - Poland
    Not exactly :). If I remember correctly (and in case this is of interest to anyone:p) this hymn of St Francis was written in a very early form of Italian; one of the earliest examples of written Italian that have been found.
    I meant Latin (Roman Catholic) religious parlance, rather than lingua latina itself, but it does not mean I can differentiate between it and Old Italian! :p Thank you for an interesting clarification!
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    The poem by St. Francis is known as "The Canticle of the Sun", and you can look up more about it under that name.

    The four words "Laudato sie mi Signore" do not mean "All praise be yours"; they instead mean "Be praised, my Lord", and each section that follows describes a piece of the created universe (such as the sun, moon, water, air, and so on) for which, and through which, God should be praised.

    Getting back to the original question, "All praise be yours" is in the subjunctive mood; it means much the same ting as "May all praise be given to you."
     

    polybolos

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Green whiteBlue,
    What a profound your comment is!!!
    The four words "Laudato sie mi Signore" do not mean "All praise be yours"; they instead mean "Be praised, my Lord", and each section that follows describes a piece of the created universe (such as the sun, moon, water, air, and so on) for which, and through which, God should be praised.
    I had not reached to this idea. Thanks to your comment, now I've got it, big thank you!
    Getting back to the original question, "All praise be yours" is in the subjunctive mood; it means much the same ting as "May all praise be given to you."
    Oh, the phrase is in the subjunctive mood. Ok, I understood it , thank you so much!
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top