All production is strictly made in Italy

maryscotti221166

Senior Member
Italiano
Hello everybody,

Does "All production is strictly made in Italy" make sense to you? Does it sound right?
I am especially interested in U.S. English, commercial.

Many thanks and merry Christmas! :)
 
  • danielsondanielson

    Member
    Czech
    I would think "strictly" has become a fashionable word in UK in connection with "Strictly Come Dancing" and its recent scandals. But in this particular context "strictly" is probably strictly useless, "only" or "solely" being much more natural instead.
     

    Redshade

    Banned
    UK
    English.
    Hi.
    It is difficult to know exactly what you mean without context.
    I would think that in most situations "products" or "produce"
    is preferable to "production".
    I have problems with that "strictly".I know you are striving for emphasis about where the product comes from but it could equally mean the method of production.
    I have visions of whip-wielding supervisors patrolling the factory floor.
    How about : "All of our products are guaranteed to be made in Italy"?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    What's wrong with "All our products are made in Italy."
    Production is a process, it is not made.
    Strictly adds nothing at all to the sentence.
     

    MonkeyHawk

    Member
    USA
    English -- Mid-America
    To my American ear it sounds odd.

    I get the idea everything involved is Italian.

    If that is a perceived advantage (and, as a former owner of a Fiat, I'll need to be persuaded), then promote it as "All Italian!" "Pure Italian!" "Italy's gift to the world!" But frankly, if it doesn't involve garlic, I'll probably have my doubts about it.

    Like...if the product is traffic control lights, "all-Italian production" isn't all that persuasive.

    If the product is beautiful brunettes with eyes so deep and brown you could bathe in 'em... well, that's another matter altogether.
     

    maryscotti221166

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Thank you everybody! I see I really need to change my sentence...
    Right, the context, sorry about that! I am speaking of fashion hosiery, positioned in the highest end of the market (no, it's not a "F.ix I.t A.gain T.om", MonkeyHawk!! ^__^), and right, Redshade, I am striving for emphasis about where the hosiery is made, as it is well known that many fashion producers label their garments as "made in Italy" and still they have processes made abroad. I need to emphasize the fact that in this case each and every least part/detail of the product is actually, totally, completely made in Italy. And I think I need the "made in Italy" statement, so I need to change the "production". You are right Panjandrum, I have problems with the words "product" and "production", I have never fully understood how to use them correctly.
    So here's my new attempt:
    "All products are completely made in Italy"
    What do you think?
    Many thanks again!
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    How about "All product components made in Italy"? Or "Made and assembled in Italy"? Or "100% Italian product"?
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I suppose you're right about "components" and hosiery. Sorry. "Completely made in Italy" sounds perfect to me.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I like them both!
    What about: "Made entirely and exclusively in Italy"? Too redundant?
    I suppose it depends on how flowery the prose is that surrounds it. :) It seems a little over the top to me.

    In the U.S. the description of a high-end product will usually include very evocative, visual phrases like "hand-crafted of the finest Italian materials by generations of local craftsmen in sleepy coastal villages a stone's throw away from the glories of ancient Venice" or some such silliness. Of course, that is something you would find on a tag or in a brochure and is much too long for an identifying label. I am still not clear where you will be using this phrase or sentence.
     

    maryscotti221166

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Thank you JamesM,
    This is not for a label, it is for a business document which lists the strengths of a product.
    It has to be complete and very convincing, but I guess it should not be too flowery.
    I suppose I will have to choose between entirely and exclusively...!
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    If it is in a business setting I would suggest "entirely". To claim that the product is made exclusively in Italy might imply that no other country produces the same product.

    [edit] It just struck me... "entirely and exclusively" does not seem redundant to me if the product is referred to by name, has unique characterisitics and is made nowhere else. "XYZ stockings are made entirely and exclusively in Italy" makes sense to me in a business setting if this particular product has unique characteristics and is only made in Italy.

    For example, many countries produce sparkling wines but champagne is produced entirely and exclusively in the Champagne region of France. All the grapes must be from that region ("entirely") and it is the only place on earth where the product is produced ("exclusively").
     
    Last edited:

    maryscotti221166

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    It just struck me... "entirely and exclusively" does not seem redundant to me if the product is referred to by name, has unique characterisitics and is made nowhere else. "XYZ stockings are made entirely and exclusively in Italy" makes sense to me in a business setting if this particular product has unique characteristics and is only made in Italy.
    GREAT, that's exactly what I hoped to hear. Yes, the product fits your description exactly, therefore I will definitely use both "entirely" and "exclusively".

    Thank you SO MUCH!!!!!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In the USA they list "content" in percentages under "country of origin".

    Country of origin: 60% US content; balance imported.

    In other countries it is legal to say the product is made in that country if the final assembly is done there.

    A few years back the Walther PPKS (handgun) was produced in Portugal but the grips (which were also made in Portugal and shipped with the weapon) were screwed in place on German soil. The weapon carried the "made in Germany" imprint. This met the legal requirements of Germany at that time.

    So, depending upon the laws of the country involved "Made in ______" might not mean that the product was actually produced there as you might ordinarily understand the phrase "made in...".

    In this case I would be inclined to write:

    Assembled in Italy using 100% Italian made components.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In this case I would be inclined to write:

    Assembled in Italy using 100% Italian made components.
    Since these are stockings, I don't think there are components or assembly involved, but I can see this being adapted as something like: "These stockings are manufactured in Italy using 100% Italian made material."
     

    maryscotti221166

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Great Packard, I did not know, this is very useful information to me.
    And you are right JamesM, there are almost no components in hosiery, therefore I agree that "manufactured" is definitely more appropriate.
    Thanks a lot to both of you!
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    "100% Italian materials and workshop workmanship" is brief and could work if there is really no imported material.
     
    Last edited:

    MonkeyHawk

    Member
    USA
    English -- Mid-America
    Instead of "manufactured," how 'about "crafted."

    A manufactured thing is for the masses.

    A crafted thing is personal.

    This sounds like a product that's trying to establish a personal identity with its customers.
     

    maryscotti221166

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    I like both "workshop" and "crafted", even if I am not familiar with either! I had no idea that "manufactured" was for masses, I will immediately stop using it and I will replace it with "crafted"!

    Can "workshop" be considered an elegant synonym of "process"? This would solve another big problem that I am having!

    If this can add to the context, the final document is not addressed to customers, it is addressed to the owner of the brand name, who needs to be convinced that we are the best company to make products with their name.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I made a mistake typing. For workshop, read workmanship: 100% Italian materials and workmanship. Very sorry. :eek:
     

    MonkeyHawk

    Member
    USA
    English -- Mid-America
    I liked "workshop."

    It ties into craftsmanship and is just quirky enough in its language to belie it's a big corporation talking.

    Tell me about an Italian workship where they make the world's finest pantyhose and I don't even wonder about "exclusively" in Italy. Of course it's all made in Italy, crafted by legions of Italian dwarves knitting every stitch with tiny knitting needles. And I will entertain that fantasy even if it's Italian nylon put in a loom and packaged on an assembly line.

    It comes down to how the words affect the reader or listener.
     

    maryscotti221166

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Thank you Nun and MonkeyHawk! You really helped me a lot. If I can affect the reader with that fantasy, monkeyHawk, I have reached my goal. Thank you!
    (by the way, those dwarves do actually exist... it's a few grandma's who can do incredible things with just a needle and their hands, and who will be almost impossible to replace when they retire, because no young girls nowadays want to learn to do their work. There really is some magic, isn't it there?)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Since these are stockings, I don't think there are components or assembly involved, but I can see this being adapted as something like: "These stockings are manufactured in Italy using 100% Italian made material."

    "These stockings are manufactured in Italy using 100% Italian made material."

    I think you are 100% correct. (Language is a process. It is interesting how the process evolved in this thread).

    I might add that "materials" (with the plural "s") might be required if more than one type of material is used in the production. For instance nylon and silk blend.

    In any event I think this is an entirely satisfactory way to present this information.
     
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