all proper

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
In a record store, Alex is inviting two girls to his home:
- What you got back home, little sister, to play your fuzzy warbles on? I bet you got little save pitiful portable picnic players. Come with Uncle and hear all proper. Hear angel trumpets and devil trombones. You are invited.
A Clockwork Orange, movie

Is "all" here acts as a noun in phrases such as:
The friendly chat which comes before the interview proper is intended to relax the candidate...,
... or is the 'all' an adverb here?
Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It is a (possibly imagined) dialect construction.

    All proper = accurately/precisely/at high quality. Alex is offering to play the record on his superior record player.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It's debatable, personally, I see "all proper" as an adverbial phrase (which is why I defined it with adverbs.) However, whichever way you understand it, the effect is the same.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    It's debatable, personally, I see "all proper" as an adverbial phrase (which is why I defined it with adverbs.) However, whichever way you understand it, the effect is the same.
    But first it should be an object, I mean -- to hear what? "All" is the object. If the phrase is an adverbial, then it's describing how they hear and not what they hear..., isn't it:confused:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    To be honest, Vik, I have no idea. "Hear all proper" could mean "hear everything properly"; or it could mean "hear quite well".

    I don't think the author intends us to know how to translate it into today's standard English.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    "All proper" is similar to "completely/totally proper". "All" is not the object. It is modifying "proper" (which is modifying "hear" in the original quote.)
    So, "all" is an adverb modifying 'proper'. But then, how can the adjective 'proper' modify a verb ('hear')? Maybe do you mean that another noun/pronoun is implied? Like:
    "Come with Uncle and hear something/some music (that is) all proper." ?

    cross-posted with Loob
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The better record player will not make the music "proper".
    Adjectives are sometimes used adverbially, especially in dialects and casual speech (If you listen good, you might hear some. :)).
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top