All right, don't get a benny on

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by mickey0, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. mickey0 Senior Member

    Italy
    italian (northern)
    All right, don't get a benny on

    Hello,
    I'm watching 'The full Monty' with subpictures; my english isn't good but I' thinking that their pronounce is extremely hard and they even use many dialetic words, don't they? By the way, even with subtitles it's very hard to me. For instance, what does that phrase mean? A character said it to another to calm him down; but what does that exactly mean?

    thanks
     
  2. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    It means "Calm down. Don't get annoyed."
     
  3. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian, standard
    "Don't get excited!" or "Don't get mad!"

    (I'm not 100% sure but I think its origin is related to the stimulant Benzedrine).
     
  4. mickey0 Senior Member

    Italy
    italian (northern)
    Il senso era quasi chiaro. Ma quale è la traduzione alla lettera? Cosa è in italiano "to get a benny on"?
     
  5. Leo57 Senior Member

    Yorkshire
    UK English
    Perhaps this link will help you (with the English).
    full-monty-script

    Ciao
    Leo:)
     
  6. Caroline35 Senior Member

    Rovigo(Italy)
    Italian
    Hi guys, I must confess my ignorance by admitting that I've never heard such an expression.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 21, 2010
  7. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Don't worry about that. It's slang, which is transitory. The expression may be confined to certain groups and it may be regional. I had never heard this expression, although I live 70 km from Sheffield, where the film is set. :eek:
     
  8. Caroline35 Senior Member

    Rovigo(Italy)
    Italian
    xxx

    After having a quick look at the full-monty script I've come to the conclusion that the above phrase means calm down, don't get excited.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 21, 2010
  9. mickey0 Senior Member

    Italy
    italian (northern)
    ehhehe you didn't read fine; I said that I'm not able to understand the film with the subtitles as well....it's too much complicated it to me. I was wondering what is a "benny" ?
    What does the native think about this film?
     
  10. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Sorry, even as a native I don't know what a benny is. I had to work out the meaning of the expression "to get a benny on" from the context shown in the script. The word "benny" in isolation means nothing to me, but there is a theory at post #3. "To get a benny on" is not standard English.
     
  11. mickey0 Senior Member

    Italy
    italian (northern)
    And what kind of English is? Is it dialect?
     
  12. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Probably. We need a person from Sheffield to confirm. We probably won't find one in this forum. You could ask the question in the "English Only" forum.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2010
  13. spamvicious New Member

    English
    The term "benny on" usually means angry or stressed. I am from West Yorkshire (Bradford, which is north of Sheffield) and I use the term often usually to say something like "if I do that, she'll have a benny on" meaning..."if I do that she will get stressed and angry and cause a scene"
     
  14. Caroline35 Senior Member

    Rovigo(Italy)
    Italian
    Thanks a lot,spamvicious. I've learnt something new.
     
  15. Scottish Jimmy New Member

    English
    “Don’t get a Benny on”, is based on a character in an old British soap opera, called Crossroads, based in a motel, called Crossroads Motel, near Birmingham in England. Benny was actually mentally retarded, and worked in the motel garage, as a general laborer. So when someone says, “don’t get a Benny on”, they mean don’t get mad (or crazy), referring to Benny’s mental condition.
     
  16. takashimiike Senior Member

    italian
    "Bit of a kick in the crotch for the kiddies, but a nice benny for you and me."

    X sta parlando dei vantaggi e degli svantaggi derivanti da una certa situazione. In questo caso, sbaglio o benny è una contrazione di benefit?
     
  17. HotelEcho New Member

    English-USA
    'benny' is an "upper" or "speed" = benzadrine. anfetamina
     
  18. takashimiike Senior Member

    italian
    Ah! Grazie mille!
     
  19. macforever Senior Member

    Italian
    So Teerex51 was right.
    Hi Tee:)
     
  20. Stanleybobs

    Stanleybobs New Member

    UK
    English - UK
    I live in Sheffield but have no idea what the origin of the phrase is (although it's used quite often, or was until a few years ago).
    A similar phrase with the same meaning is "don't get a cob on" which I think originates from Liverpool.
     
  21. lentulax

    lentulax Senior Member

    Cumbria , England
    UK English
    I think more context would be needed : as it is , I'd read this as short for 'benefit' too, though of course it could mean 'upper' etc.

    I've come across 'bennie' for a benzedrine pill (I don't think the spelling is very relevant), but , though I'm a Yorkshireman, I've never even heard the expression 'to get a benny on' , but I very much doubt if it's use in 'The Full Monty' is derived from 'benzedrine'. Jimmy's 'Crossroads' idea sounds very persuasive.
     
  22. takashimiike Senior Member

    italian
    @lentulax: il romanzo che sto traducendo è un fantasy, ambientato in un mondo alternativo in cui finiscono tutte le persone che muoiono di morte violenta (una sorta di aldilà).

    Uno dei personaggi spiega che in questo "mondo" l'età non avanza, quindi i bambini resteranno tali a vita, gli adolescenti resteranno adolescenti e così via. Dal momento che chi ha parla ha una trentina d'anni, dice che per lui questo è un vantaggio.

    Per questo credo che "benny" possa essere una contrazione di "benefit".
     

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