All Slavic: I can, I am able to

LilianaB

Banned
Lithuanian
I am interested what constructions are used in various Slavic languages and dialects to express the idea of:
I can and I am able to.

If you can kindly translate those sentences into your languages and discuss other possible ways of expressing the same. I can ride a bike.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Brainiac

    Senior Member
    Srpski - Kosovo
    Serbian:
    I can - Mogu.
    I am able to - Sposoban sam za/da ..., Kadar sam za (/da) ..., Ja sam u stanju da ..., Ja sam u mogućnosti da...., and sometimes: Znam da (I know to..) or Mogu da... (I can...), depending on the context.
     
    Last edited:

    Brainiac

    Senior Member
    Srpski - Kosovo
    Oh, you have edited your post.
    I can ride a bike - (Serbian) Znam da vozim bicikl. You can say Umem da vozim bicikl, but I, for instant, use the first sentence. This means like - I know to swim.

    You may say - Mogu da vozim bicikl, but it means - now I am able to ride a bike (But I couldn't, say, one month ago, I had an injury). Or - it is allowed to me to ride a bike (say: My parents forbade me that one month ago, but they allow me to ride it now.)
     
    Last edited:
    Note that Znam da + present can also be expressed as Znam + infinitive, and the latter would be preffered and more frequently used in standard Croatian and by at least a part of Bosnian speakers. There is probably an earlier thread discussing the preference for da + present vs infinitive in different BCS standard languages.

    So:

    I can ride a bike - Znam voziti biciklo
    (in standard Bosnian both biciklo n. and bicikl m. are acceptable; I normally use biciklo)
     
    Last edited:

    Brainiac

    Senior Member
    Srpski - Kosovo
    Yes, Denis, thank you. I will edit my post and say "in Serbian". I know for the difference, but I still "think in Serbian".
    We say bicikla f. too, but we don't use biciklo.
     

    YKYPEH

    Member
    US
    Russian
    Russian:

    I can ride a bike. = Я могу ездить на велосипеде. (May also indicate that permission to ride was granted.)
    I am able to ride a bike. = Я умею ездить на велосипеде.
     

    Azori

    Senior Member
    Slovak:

    I can = Viem... / Môžem... / Dokážem... / Som schopný/schopná... / Mám možnosť... etc. (there are many ways to say this, depending on the context)

    I am able to = I can

    I can ride a bike. = Môžem jazdiť na bicykli. (I have an opportunity to ride a bike / I am allowed to ride a bike)
    Viem jazdiť na bicykli. (I know how to ride a bike)

    The verb umieť is archaic / literary in Slovak.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Based in our previous discussions, I believe these are the equivalents of the most common "can"/"be able to"/"know" verbs in modern Czech, Slovak, Slovenian, and BCS (given that umieť /umeti is archaic in Slovak and Slovenian and apparently rare [or not -- see DenisBiH's post below] in BCS):

    Czech
    Slovak
    Slovenian
    BCS
    znát
    poznať
    poznati
    znati
    umět
    vedieť
    znati
    znati
    vědět
    vedieť
    vedeti
    znati


    Please do feel free to correct me!

    And a quick addition to my post about Slovenian:

    I may (am allowed to) ride my bike. = Smem se voziti s kolesom. // Lahko se vozim s kolesom.
     
    Last edited:
    I wouldn't say that umjeti is rare, at least I don't think I perceive it as such. It's certainly not marked as formal, archaic or (only) literary for me. On the other hand, perhaps it really is rarely used and I haven't noticed that before.
     
    Last edited:

    Azori

    Senior Member
    In Slovak dictionary from late sixties things are so: umiem, umieš, umie, umieme, umiete, umejú .
    This linguistic journal which was published in 1933 says the verb umieť doesn't exist in Slovak (p. 120):
    V slovenčine niet slovesa umieť (č. uměti), jeho význam prešiel na vedieť, ktoré takýmto činom značí to, čo v češtine uměti i věděti.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top