All Slavic languages: Ciężko pracujemy, by stworzyć coś wyjątkowego

Witam wszystkich ! :D

I am very curious how these verbs are used in the following phrases in different Slavic languages ?


Ciężko pracujemy, by stworzyć coś wyjątkowego. = We are working hard to create something special.
 
  • vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Hello there..

    There's a couple of options..

    Slovak - Ťažko pracujeme, aby sme vytvorili niečo výnimočné. / Usilovne pracujeme na vytvorení niečoho výnimočného.

    Czech - Těžce pracujeme, abychom vytvořili něco výjimečného. / Usilovně pracujeme na vytvoření něčeho výjimečného.

    Ciężko pracujemy, by stworzyć coś wyjątkowego

    We let God take care of stvoriť / stvořit. :D
     
    Hello there..

    There's a couple of options..

    Slovak - Ťažko pracujeme, aby sme vytvorili niečo výnimočné. / Usilovne pracujeme na vytvorení niečoho výnimočného.

    Czech - Těžce pracujeme, abychom vytvořili něco výjimečného. / Usilovně pracujeme na vytvoření něčeho výjimečného.



    We let God take care of stvoriť / stvořit. :D
    Dziękuję bardzo ! 🙂

    Basically I was curious about the synonyms of the verb to make (create) etc.. in different Slavic languages..
    And I would like to know also how do you say porabiać ?

    Więc, co tu porabiasz?

    porabiać = trudnić się, parać się , zajmować się czymś.

    porabiać - Wielki słownik języka polskiego PAN


    robić;
    → czynić;
    → zrobić;
    → tworzyć;
    → sporządzać;
    → wytwarzać ;
    → produkować;
    → wyrabiać ;
    → dokonywać ;
    → sporządzić;
    → utworzyć;
    → poczynić ;
    → wykonywać ;
    → fabrykować;
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Basically I was curious about the synonyms of the verb to make (create) etc.. in different Slavic languages..
    Russian (perfective):
    сделать (sdélat') - to do/make;
    создать (sozdát') - to create;
    сотворить (sotvorít') - to create (usually elevated, rarely used in everyday life due to stylistic limitations and possible unwanted associations);
    произвести (proizvestí) - to produce (very formal, or implying industrial production, or in certain set expressions);
    изготовить (izgotóvit') - to make, to produce (about utilitarian physical objects);

    In other contexts other verbs may be used:
    выработать (výrabotat') - to produce (typically regarding substances), to work out;
    натворить (natvorít') - to do (about mischiefs and other activities with harmful but typically unintentional results);
    вытворить (výtvorit') - to do (about cases of some spectacular misbehaviour);
    учинить (uchinít') - to do (about violent unlawful activities), to organize (archaic);
    продуцировать (produtsírovat') - to produce (very formal and technical, normally about substances and immaterial things).
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    robić;
    → czynić;
    → zrobić;
    → tworzyć;
    → sporządzać;
    → wytwarzać ;
    → produkować;
    → wyrabiać ;
    → dokonywać ;
    → sporządzić;
    → utworzyć;
    → poczynić ;
    → wykonywać ;
    → fabrykować;
    I think most of these verbs appear in other Slavic languages, as well, even if not exactly with same meaning ...

    However, for me is interesting the impersonal structure "by stworzyć" instead of something like "aby stworzyliśmy". In which other Slavic language is this structure possible?
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    However, for me is interesting the impersonal structure "by stworzyć"
    Russian would use a similar construction "chtóby sozdát'/sotvorít'/..." here. Such infinitive phrases of purpose are used by default whenever the subjects of both actions are coreferential. (Overall I have an impression that West and East Slavic languages demonstrate more similarities in syntax.)
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    To note, Russian can use infinitives in optative-subjunctive constructions as well:
    водки бы выпить (vódki by výpit') - ~it would be good to have some vodka;
    мне бы попасть туда (mné by popást' tudá) - I'd like to get there; it would be good if I get there.
     

    Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    So you don't use any smo or ste? Therefore there's no difference between the three persons both in singular and plural?

    Correct, in Slovenian the conditional is formed with simply adding bi to all persons and numbers (including dual) ;)
     
    I think most of these verbs appear in other Slavic languages, as well, even if not exactly with same meaning ...

    However, for me is interesting the impersonal structure "by stworzyć" instead of something like "aby stworzyliśmy". In which other Slavic language is this structure possible?


    Wykorzystałem ich, by stworzyć coś pożyteczniejszego. I used them to create something more beneficial.

    Czy chciałbyś abyśmy stworzyli reklamę świetlną dla Twojej firmy? Would you like us to create luminous advertising for your company ?



    The conditional is formed from the past tense, by, and the personal ending (if any). For example: byłbym/byłabym ("I would be", masc/fem.), byłbyś/byłabyś, byłby/byłaby/byłoby; bylibyśmy/byłybyśmy, bylibyście/byłybyście, byliby/byłyby.

    The personal past tense suffixes, which are reduced forms of the present tense of być, are clitics and can be detached from the verb to attach to another accented word earlier in the sentence, such as a question word (as in kogoście zobaczyli as an alternative to kogo zobaczyliście "whom did you see"), or (mostly in informal speech) an emphatic particle że (co żeście zrobili? "what did you do").
    The same applies to the conditional endings (kiedy byście przyszli as an alternative to kiedy przyszlibyście "when would you come").

    If by introduces the clause, either alone or forming one of the conjunctions żeby, iżby, ażeby, aby, coby, it forms the subjunctive mood and is not to be confused with the conditional clitic by.
    For example, "He wants me to sing" might be chce, aby(m) śpiewał, chce, żeby(m) śpiewał or chce, by(m) śpiewał.
    Such clauses may express "in order that", or be used with verbs meaning "want", "expect", etc.

    Polish forms the conditional mood in a similar way to Russian, using the particle by together with the past tense of the verb. This is an enclitic particle, which often attaches to the first stressed word in the clause, rather than following the verb. It also takes the personal endings (in the first and second persons) which usually attach to the past tense. For example:

    • śpiewałem/śpiewałam ("I sang", masculine/feminine)
    • śpiewał(a)bym, or ja bym śpiewał(a) ("I would sing")
    The clitic can move after conjunctions, e.g.:

    • gdybym śpiewał ("if I sang"), forming a conditional conjunction gdyby, jeśliby is also possible here
    • myślę, że by śpiewał ("I think that he would sing")
    Note that the clitic can not form a single verb with certain conjunctions, nor start the subordinate clause, as it would change the meaning to the subjunctive, e.g.

    • chcę, żeby śpiewał or a shorter chcę, by śpiewał ("I want him to sing")
    There is also a past conditional, which also includes the past tense of the copular verb być, as in był(a)bym śpiewał(a) ("I would have sung"), but this is rarely used.
     
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