All Slavic languages: Comrade (socialist term)

alex1000

New Member
Serbocroatian
What term was used in your country to refer to government officials during communism? I know in Russian it's tovarish, I am not sure what's the origin of that word. In Serbo-Croatian we used "drug", literally meaning a "friend". The term is still commonly used among Social Democrats in Croatia.
 
  • Panceltic

    Senior Member
    Slovenščina
    In Slovenian, it is tovariš (and tovarišica). These two words have kinda held on in schools where children use it to address teachers. I was in primary school until 2006 and called my teachers tovariš and tršica (heavily reduced as you can see :)).

    BTW the origin of tovariš is Turkic.
     

    pimlicodude

    Senior Member
    British English
    In Russian, it's товарищ (tovarišč). This is used for both male and female. There is a colloquial female товарка.
     

    vianie

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Czech and Slovak - soudruh and súdruh

    feminine form - soudružka and súdružka
     
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    jasio

    Senior Member
    With regards to the origins, both in Russian and in Polish it means comrade (like in comrade-in-arms), companion, colleague, mate - something along those lines, depending on context. In the context of the communist party it's usually translated as comrade.
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    With regards to the origins, both in Russian and in Polish it means comrade (like in comrade-in-arms), companion, colleague, mate - something along those lines, depending on context. In the context of the communist party it's usually translated as comrade.
    Yes; and I personally prefer this word in conversations when talking about people I know closely, as it implies some adulthood and self-responsibility. In Russian, друг (druh, przyjaciel) is a really close friend, but, I don't like this word much and consider it somewhat childish - because many people have an idea of that like "I am to cover my friend whenever he messes up or lets everybody down, because he would cover me in same situation" - while I don't play these games and so prefer "comrades". Приятель that corresponds to przyjaciel, is in Russian rather a znajomy, only with some mutual sympathy that involves chattering and other occasional carefree pastime.
    In principle, comrade is a really good notion, only that dogmatic communism (along with anti-communism) spoiled it.
     
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