All Slavic languages: Difficulties with azbuka

cecoll

Member
Bulgarian
Suane said:
I think it's rather difficult for people that write with Azbuka (or cyrilic) to learn to write fluently with Latin.

Hi,

Please allow me to disagree with this statement !!!

I think people with "latin" alphabet more often get cofused when learning another "latin" foreign language, especially with the pronounciation of similar letters and so on, and that reflects the way they write too...People with Cyrillic Alphabet (Azbuka) like me :D, get to learn the letters and the language from scratch and so confusion is unlikely to occur...

On the other side for them is double so difficult to understand cyrillic alphabet, and honestly in most cases they show no interest in understanding it...(of course when trying to learn russian they`ll have to...although there are still people trying to learn russian with "latin" alphabets :( !)

cvetan
 
  • natasha2000

    Senior Member
    cecoll said:
    Hi,

    Please allow me to disagree with this statement !!!

    I think people with "latin" alphabet more often get cofused when learning another "latin" foreign language, especially with the pronounciation of similar letters and so on, and that reflects the way they write too...People with Cyrillic Alphabet (Azbuka) like me :D, get to learn the letters and the language from scratch and so confusion is unlikely to occur...

    On the other side for them is double so difficult to understand cyrillic alphabet, and honestly in most cases they show no interest in understanding it...(of course when trying to learn russian they`ll have to...although there are still people trying to learn russian with "latin" alphabets :( !)

    cvetan

    I agree with Cvetan, although my judgement maybe is not so objective, since Serbians use both alphabets in the same way. By the age of 10, all children in Serbia know to write and read both in cyrillic and latinic alphabet... So, as far as I am concerned, I did not find any difficulties in using latinic alphabet... Not at all... As a matter of fact, due to the fact that my both foreign languages are written in latinic alphabet, I use rather latinic than cirillic when write, which ofcourse does not represent any difficulties for me when it comes to read cirilic texts....
     

    Suane

    Senior Member
    Slovakia
    cecoll said:
    Hi,
    I think people with "latin" alphabet more often get cofused when learning another "latin" foreign language, especially with the pronounciation of similar letters and so on, and that reflects the way they write too...People with Cyrillic Alphabet (Azbuka) like me :D, get to learn the letters and the language from scratch and so confusion is unlikely to occur...
    Something on your opinion is true. But a lot of words, especially in English is very similar to those in Slovak (like new words- system,...). Pronounciation is something else, it's almost the same difficult for latin and cyrillic people. English have some rules about prounounciation, so when I was learning English, sh meant always š for me, and so on. But, for example in reading and writting, people that normally write and read in latin, it is quite easier to do so in english because they maybe can better imagine what the words mean and how to write some letters. But for people that write normally with cyrillica is maybe that part more difficult, when they have to still think about the letters (I'm certainly not speaking about very fluent writters and readers). I think so because in my american school, we have one Russian girl, who is 2 years in America, and can fluently speak English, but she has still some problems when she has to read or write. I don't know. If I should learn to write in cyrillic letters I will find that quite difficult. Once I tried to understand cyrillic letters, but it was so difficult to look up every letter in the paper.

    And, I think that Russian and Serbian cyrillic isn't exactly the same or...?
    How long or intensive do you study English?
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Suane said:
    Something on your opinion is true. But a lot of words, especially in English is very similar to those in Slovak (like new words- system,...). Pronounciation is something else, it's almost the same difficult for latin and cyrillic people. English have some rules about prounounciation, so when I was learning English, sh meant always š for me, and so on. But, for example in reading and writting, people that normally write and read in latin, it is quite easier to do so in english because they maybe can better imagine what the words mean and how to write some letters. But for people that write normally with cyrillica is maybe that part more difficult, when they have to still think about the letters (I'm certainly not speaking about very fluent writters and readers). I think so because in my american school, we have one Russian girl, who is 2 years in America, and can fluently speak English, but she has still some problems when she has to read or write. I don't know. If I should learn to write in cyrillic letters I will find that quite difficult. Once I tried to understand cyrillic letters, but it was so difficult to look up every letter in the paper.

    And, I think that Russian and Serbian cyrillic isn't exactly the same or...?
    How long or intensive do you study English?

    No, they are not exactly the same, there are some letters in Russian that do not exist in Serbian and vice versa...
    Maybe that Russian girl has usual problems with spelling, like any other English speaking person, since spelling in Engish does not have any rules, (as you all know very well;) ), and not with latinic letters? It's a question... As I said, I cannot judge about it, since I am not in a position of someone who learnt latinic letters as a part of a foreign language.... Cvetan, as a Bulgarin, says there is no difficulty, and I believe him. Maybe some Russian can tell us his/her experience...
     

    Suane

    Senior Member
    Slovakia
    natasha2000 said:
    I agree with Cvetan, although my judgement maybe is not so objective, since Serbians use both alphabets in the same way. By the age of 10, all children in Serbia know to write and read both in cyrillic and latinic alphabet... So, as far as I am concerned, I did not find any difficulties in using latinic alphabet... Not at all... As a matter of fact, due to the fact that my both foreign languages are written in latinic alphabet, I use rather latinic than cirillic when write, which ofcourse does not represent any difficulties for me when it comes to read cirilic texts....
    It must be perfect to know how to write both way. I wish I was learnt how to write in cyrillic in childhood too. Then it will be natural for me. I don't like that in my scholl (Gymnazium, High school) we don't have the opportunity to study some cyrillic language. Do you have also Gymnazium in your country? In USA Gymnasium means the place where you exercise. So when I tell someone that I studied on one, it has to sound quite weird.

    EDIT: The discussion about gymnasium was moved here.
     
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