All Slavic Languages: Excuse me?

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Musique

New Member
America American
Greetings,
I would like to know how to say "Excuse me?" in all of the Slavic languages. Like you didn't hear something.

Thank you for your time,
Musique
 
  • cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Belarussian:

    Прабач? [pra'batch] (famiiar)
    Прабачце? [pra'batchtsje] (polite)


     

    Esc

    New Member
    Russian
    Tombatossals said:
    In Russian:
    Извините, пожалуйста!
    No. This is an apology, but not something you say when you didn't hear people. Please check the request if you missed that part. This one never goes as a suggesting question. It's a plain straight apology for something.
     

    Marijka

    Member
    Polish/Poland
    You can translate "excuse me" into Polish in different ways, it all depends on context:

    excuse me, what did you say? = it can be słucham? commonly used when one didn't hear something, it can also express astonishment ( but it' s more like something between "what??" and "excuse me?") Proszę? is more polite.
    excuse me, can you tell me...= przepraszam, czy możesz mi powiedzieć...
    excuse me ( when you're asking for forgiveness) = przepraszam or proszę mi wybaczyć or wybacz.
     

    cajzl

    Senior Member
    Czech
    It is interesting that "excuse me?" is an imperative paradoxically followed by question mark. It may be unnatural in some languages.

    "Excuse me?" obviously means:

    Excuse me, what did you say? (or what have you said?)

    In Czech:

    Promiňte, co jste říkal? (co jste to řekl?)
     

    Krossaffschcheg

    New Member
    Russia/Russian
    Excuse me, what did you say?
    [Что/Што/Шо/Що/Чё?/Чиво] - standart 1 "usually"
    [Простите?/Простите, я не понял?/Извините?/Пардон?/Еще разок?/Еще раз?] - standart 2 "Civil"
    [Ни понял?] - standart 3

    Excuse me
    [Извините/простите/прошу простить/прошу извинить/извиняюсь/извините пожалуйста/Дико извиняюсь/Сорри]
     

    skye

    Senior Member
    Slovenian
    Oprostite?

    I think you could also say "Prosim", but I haven't heard it used in conversation very often. Only when someone tried to show that they can't believe what they just heard: Prosim!?
     

    nestinari

    Member
    Bulgarian (България)
    My little contribution (Bulgarian):

    Mólya? (that is the most frequent) / Izvinéte,... / Proshtávaite,...(quite formal)

    *of course, there are no written accent marks in Bulgarian ;)
     

    Tomby

    Senior Member
    Spanish/Catalan
    Esc said:
    No. This is an apology, but not something you say when you didn't hear people. Please check the request if you missed that part. This one never goes as a suggesting question. It's a plain straight apology for something.
    :confused:
    Извините меня, но я не согласен с Вами.
    Прочитайте пожалуйста:

    ПРОСТИТЬ...//...4. прости(те). извини(те) (см. извинить в 3 энач.)...//...5. прости(те). То же, что извини(те) (см. извинить в 4 энач.)...
    (Толковый Словарь Руcского Языка. С.И. Ожегов и Н. Ю. Шведова. 1995)

    Всего хорошего!:thumbsup:
     

    kali

    Senior Member
    Ukraine - Ukrainian
    In ukrainian when we ask a person to repeat something we havn't heard o to ask an information like excuse me, what did you say? or excuse me, can you please tell me... we say вибач(те), перепрошую
    to say excuse me, may i go, with your permition and also to say excuse me but you are wrong... we can say даруй(те)
    But to ask an apologise, like i'm sorry, i beg your pardon etc... we say пробач(те) and also вибач(те).
     

    mikesz14

    Member
    Polish/Poland
    Marijka said:
    You can translate "excuse me" into Polish in different ways, it all depends on context:

    excuse me, what did you say? = it can be słucham? commonly used when one didn't hear something, it can also express astonishment ( but it' s more like something between "what??" and "excuse me?") Proszę? is more polite.
    excuse me, can you tell me...= przepraszam, czy możesz mi powiedzieć...
    excuse me ( when you're asking for forgiveness) = przepraszam or proszę mi wybaczyć or wybacz.
    wow :) nie przypuszczalem ze takie podstawowe slowko ma w polskim az 3 kontexty :)
     

    Saluton

    Banned
    Russian
    Tombatossals:
    извините? or простите? or что, простите? (the latter two are more common) would work here with an interrogative intonation. With пожалуйста or with an exclamation mark, it would sound strange and be hard, although possible, to understand. Пожалуйста even seems a bit out of place at the end of a question.
     

    Natabka

    Senior Member
    Ukraine (Ukrainian)
    Excuse me, what did you say?
    [Что/Што/Шо/Що/Чё?/Чиво] - standart 1 "usually"
    [Простите?/Простите, я не понял?/Извините?/Пардон?/Еще разок?/Еще раз?] - standart 2 "Civil"
    [Ни понял?] - standart 3

    Excuse me
    [Извините/простите/прошу простить/прошу извинить/извиняюсь/извините пожалуйста/Дико извиняюсь/Сорри]

    Krossaffschcheg here has given lots of slang variants and couldn't help commenting on some :). "Дико извиняюсь/Сорри" are mostly used by students (at least, with us) and they are obvious calques/transliterations from English - "I'm terribly sorry"/"Sorry".

    As for "Excuse me?" meaning "Repeat once more, please" we have numerous jokes concerning "Шо? Га?" [sho? ha?] (What?? Huh??) in Ukrainian. They are not suitable for formal conversation or well educated people :) but still everyone is using them - since they're short and without any additional meaning except "What you've just said???"

    And saying simply "Що ти кажеш/сказав,-ла?" [Scho ty kazhesh/skazav, skazala?] ("What do you say/have said?") will be also alright in the majority of contexts. Only mind the difference between polite forms ти-Ви [ty-Vy].
     

    hinko

    Senior Member
    slovenia, slovenian
    Oprostite?

    I think you could also say "Prosim", but I haven't heard it used in conversation very often. Only when someone tried to show that they can't believe what they just heard: Prosim!?
    I disagree. I think "prosim" is used much more often than "oprostite". Oprostite is more used for apologizing, than in the context described above.
     

    vatreno

    Member
    Scooby-Doo
    I disagree. I think "prosim" is used much more often than "oprostite". Oprostite is more used for apologizing, than in the context described above.
    In Croatian, zao mi je (this must be used in all ex-Yu except slovenia) is used for apoligizing and means sort of like it is my fault in English. Oprostite means excuse me like used to get someones attention... not sure if it can be used like oops my fault also.

    Bosnians use Izvinite like Oprostite but it has the same meaning. If you did not hear someone correctly I am not sure if you use Oprostite but you can say poniviti molim (repeat please).

    If you just say molim (please) it might confuse what is being said unless the person will obviously know what you are talking about.
     
    Last edited:

    tommy_tw

    New Member
    Slovak, slovenský jazyk
    In Slovak it have 2 meanings.
    1. Prosím
    2. Prepáč / Prepáčte
    The diferrence between prepáč and prepáčte is that prepáčte is for plural and it can be used in formal speech and prepáč is singular and unformal.
     

    User1001

    Senior Member
    American English
    You could use either Прocтeтe (Prostete), Извинете (Izvinete), or Извини (Izvini) in Macedonian.
     

    MIODRAG

    Banned
    none -- all languages I use are equally "foreign" to me
    I like the "promiňte" -- it sounds fresh, like mint candy. :p

    Also, I understand it as "pro-" = "go by"/"let it pass" + "min" = "мъненїе"/"meaning", so to me it appears more like a friendly suggestion "don't take it seriously", perhaps like the egalitarian Dutch half-command "Sorry, hoor!" rather than most Slavonic (and other I-E) languages begging for forgiveness.

    Obviously I do know it is not the context in which "promiňte" is used today, but I like phonetics (indeed acoustics) and etymology best, so they define my approach to language in the perosnal, non-academic, sphere.
     
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