All Slavic languages: International cuisine

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SerinusCanaria3075

Senior Member
México, D.F. (Spanish)
Good one.

Can you all help me translate "International Kitchen"? So far I only know kitchen but I'm missing the adjective (which unfortunately I don't know if it inflects with the noun it modifies):

(Bulgarian) кухня
(Byelorussian) кухия
(Chechen) кухие
(Croatian) kuhinja
(Czech) kuchyně
(Macedonian) кујна
(Polish) kuchnia
(Russian) кухня
(Serbian) кухиња
(Slovak) kuchyňa
(Turkmen) кухнйа
(Ukranian) кухня [is it pronounced: kujña / kukhnya?]

The letters in color I'm not sure how to pronounce.

Thanks.
 
  • dudasd

    Senior Member
    Serbo-Croatian
    (Bulgarian) международна/интернационалНа кухня
    (Croatian) međunarodna/internacionalna kuhinja
    (Macedonian) международна/интернационалНа кујна
    (Russian) международная/интернационалЬНая кухня
    (Serbian) међународна/интернационална кухиња
    As much as I have noticed in Macedonia, Croatia, Serbia and Bulgaria (I've never been in Russia, so I can't tell), at touristic places and in restaurant menus интернационалНа, internacionalna etc. are more preferred than международна, međunarodna etc.

    PS Your pronunciation of "кухня" is OK, just keep on mind that it's actually the same word in Russian and Bulgarian.
     

    kelt

    Senior Member
    Czech Republic, Czech
    The Czech word is spelled kuchyně. IPA for -ně is [-ɲɛ].

    But I am afraid you have the translation wrong - you probably mean international cuisine - as in restaurants serving meals from all over the world. Nevertheless the Czech for it is still the same:) mezinárodní kuchyně.

    Hope that helps.
     

    SerinusCanaria3075

    Senior Member
    México, D.F. (Spanish)
    Ah, I see what you mean. Cuisine though in my opinion seems a bit formal, like a culinary art (which obviously it is). Kitchen on the other hand has a more "home feeling" to it, which is what I'm trying to go for. Personally I have no idea why the British/Americans always adopt this sort of French nonsense, since like you said, in Czech it's always "kuchyně" and in Spanish it's always "cocina":).

    at touristic places and in restaurant menus интернационалНа, internacionalna etc. are more preferred than международна, međunarodna etc.
    Is the "ц" in "интернационалНа" pronounced like "ts" in Romanian "internaţională"?

    P.S. Just to make sure, adjectives precede the noun they modify in most Slavic languages, correct?
     

    dudasd

    Senior Member
    Serbo-Croatian
    I don't know Romanian so can't answer directly, let's say that "ц" in "интернационалНа" is pronounced as zz in Italian "pizza" or z in Austrian "Graz".
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    A comment on the English:

    Nonsensical as you may find it, it has to be "international cuisine." "International kitchen" would not make sense. "Kitchen" refers to the actual room that you cook in.
     

    dudasd

    Senior Member
    Serbo-Croatian
    I may be wrong, but by my own feeling, in this context, "international kitchen" is quite correct because it means "our kitchen staff prepares international meals", ergo "we have an international kitchen". I use cuisine too when I talk about features of food characteristic for some area, but in this case I think I'd say kitchen. Quoting from Merriam-Webster's Dictionary:

    1 : a place (as a room) with cooking facilities
    2 : the personnel that prepares, cooks, and serves food
    3 : cuisine
     

    papillon

    Senior Member
    Russian (Ukraine)
    ..."our kitchen staff prepares international meals", ergo "we have an international kitchen".
    I'm with elroy on this one. If you told me that your restaurant had an international kitchen I would expect to find, say... a Swede, a Mexican, a Russian and two Filipino cooks working the lunch shift.

    If you don't like the word cuisine, you can probably just say food - Mexican food, Serbian food etc.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Actually, we don't even know the context!

    Where is this phrase going to be used? What is it supposed to refer to?

    I assumed that the reference was to the actual food. In that case, I would definitely say "international cuisine."
     

    Athaulf

    Senior Member
    Croatian/Bosnia, Croatia
    As much as I have noticed in Macedonia, Croatia, Serbia and Bulgaria (I've never been in Russia, so I can't tell), at touristic places and in restaurant menus интернационалНа, internacionalna etc. are more preferred than международна, međunarodna etc.
    In Croatia, međunarodni is used much more widely than internacionalni these days. I would definitely recommend using the former there.
     

    dudasd

    Senior Member
    Serbo-Croatian
    "Međunarodna" is, being a Slavic word, always better than "internacionalna"; my point was just that because of some unknown reason restaurant owners often think that "internacionalna" sounds better. (More international? :) ) Anyway, if I kept an international restaurant, I'd probably put something like "dishes from all the world" (in all the Slavic languages it would sound nice and friendly, I think).
     

    OldAvatar

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Is the "ц" in "интернационалНа" pronounced like "ts" in Romanian "internaţională"?
    Yes, it is. However, some Slavic languages pronounce it slightly different. We call it „a soft ţ”. It is present in some Romanian accents too, especially in Republic of Moldova, and it is a ţ pronounced with the air coming out fast on the way between the tongue and the top teeth, making a final sound similar with a short whistle. I'm not sure if that would be a perfect description, but that's how it sounds to me.
     

    Gżegżółka

    Member
    Polska; polski
    In Polish it's:

    Kuchnia międzynarodowa

    and it means both kitchen and cuisine.
    Alternately you can say:

    Kuchnie świata - cuisines / kitchens of the world
     
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