All Slavic languages: Jagoda, jahoda, strawberry, blueberry

  • natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Jagoda said:
    Jagoda = Blueberry

    ;)

    Hahahha.... You see? This is what I meant... Same word two different meanings...

    Jagoda
    In Serbian =Strawberry
    In Polish = Blueberry

    It is much more possible to make confusion with two similar languages than with two different ones...
     

    Suane

    Senior Member
    Slovakia
    Jagoda said:
    Jagoda = Blueberry

    ;)

    Really? Now I am bit confused because in my computer dictionary it is said

    - strawberry (jahoda)- truskawka, jagoda, poziomka leśna

    - strawberry (adjective, jahodový)-truskawkowi, poziomkowy

    - jahôdka, jahůdka (little strawberry? or maybe sort of apple?)-jagódka

    - blueberry (čučoriedka) - czarna jagoda (čierna jahoda?), czernica, (černica?), borówka (borůvka?), jagoda

    So, I guess that basically truskawka=strawberry, jagoda=blueberry, but what does it mean jagódka, and why there is also jagoda for strawberry?

    Mad srawberry=:mad: :D
     

    natasha2000

    Senior Member
    Suane said:
    Really? Now I am bit confused because in my computer dictionary it is said

    - strawberry (jahoda)- truskawka
    jagoda
    poziomka leśna

    - strawberry (adjective, jahodový)-truskawkowi
    poziomkowy

    - jahôdka, jahůdka (little strawberry? or maybe sort of apple?)-jagódka

    - blueberry (čučoriedka) - czarna jagoda (čierna jahoda?)
    czernica (černica?)
    borówka (borůvka?)
    jagoda

    So, I guess that basically truskawka=strawberry, jagoda=blueberry, but what does it mean jagódka, and why there is also jagoda for strawberry?

    Mad srawberry=:mad: :D

    "Borówka" reminds me a lot of "borovnica" which is blueberry in Serbian...
     

    Jagoda

    Senior Member
    Bilingual polski-English
    Jagódka is diminutive for jagoda, which means "blueberry".
    As well, fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, gooseberries, currents, etc. are classified as "berries" in botanical termes. "Berries" in Polish is "jagody". That is why you have jagoda under the word strawberry - they have first given you the direct translation into Polish (truskawka) and then the group to which it belongs, the group of berries (jagoda).
     

    Suane

    Senior Member
    Slovakia
    Jagoda said:
    Jagódka is diminutive for jagoda, which means "blueberry".
    As well, fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, gooseberries, currents, etc. are classified as "berries" in botanical termes. "Berries" in Polish is "jagody". That is why you have jagoda under the word strawberry - they have first given you the direct translation into Polish (truskawka) and then the group to which it belongs, the group of berries (jagoda).

    Thank you! Now I understand. I really don't know, how that can happen, that the same word in one slavic language means something else in another one. I wish I could know how did the process of naming things work in the past.

    And it's interesting:
    Strawberry is jahoda in Slovak, in Czech, something similar in Serbian, but it is said a bit different way in Polish. Maybe we can give this question to the topic Similar words and find out how it is said in another slavic languages.
     

    skye

    Senior Member
    Slovenian
    I thought you were strawberry too. ;)

    In Slovenian it's the same as in Serbian: jagoda - strawberry, borovnica - blueberry
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    In Russian ягода /jagoda/ is a berry - as a generic term. The plural is ягоды /jagody/. It's similar to the Polish word with the same meaning but the stress is on the first syllable, whereas in Polish it's surely on the second.

    And naturally, I was sure I understood the meaning of the nickname and it would never occur to me that it could mean strawberry or blueberry!:)

    My question to Polish native speakers: doesn't it lead to confusion when one and the same word stands for blueberry and any berry at all?

    By the way, in my mind this word is associated not only with berries. Genrikh Jagoda (Yagoda) was Stalin's secret police chief during the great purges of 1936-38. Sorry, that wasn't a particularly pleasant association.:eek:
     

    Marijka

    Member
    Polish/Poland
    cyanista said:
    My question to Polish native speakers: doesn't it lead to confusion when one and the same word stands for blueberry and any berry at all?

    No, not at all. Usually we use jagoda for blueberry, and owoce jagodowe (owoce=fruits) for berries in general.
    Jagoda is also a female name :)

    And, as I wrote owoce, one more thing comes to my mind. In polish owoce means fruits, but овочі (ukrainian) = овощи (russian) = vegetables, and it souds very similar to owoce...it's quite confusing:)
     

    Jagoda

    Senior Member
    Bilingual polski-English
    As well, we have the female name "Malina", which also means raspberry in Polish. :)
    There's also "Róza" which in English is Rose.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Marijka said:
    No, not at all. Usually we use jagoda for blueberry, and owoce jagodowe (owoce=fruits) for berries in general.
    Jagoda is also a female name :)
    At least something works! I don't know anyone called Jahoda (strawberry) but there certainly are people called Borůvka (blueberry). :D

    Jana
     

    Juri

    Senior Member
    italian/Slovenia
    A!A! You remind to me that a chief of Stalin's police has been Jagoda.
    I didn't find him in Google, but: Flory Jagoda, artist USA, Jagoda Strukelj, a dancer,Jagoda Potokar a journalist and so on.
    In accessgenealogy.com there are 51 Jagoda.
    We never know!
     

    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    Juri said:
    A!A! You remind to me that a chief of Stalin's police has been Jagoda.
    I didn't find him in Google, but: Flory Jagoda, artist USA, Jagoda Strukelj, a dancer,Jagoda Potokar a journalist and so on.
    In accessgenealogy.com there are 51 Jagoda.
    We never know!

    The transliteration "Jagoda" is typical for German sources, while the english-speaking ones prefer "Yagoda". And in Slavic languages? Surely the former?
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    cyanista said:
    The transliteration "Jagoda" is typical for German sources, while the english-speaking ones prefer "Yagoda". And in Slavic languages? Surely the former?
    Yes, we write what we hear. :)

    Jana
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    cyanista said:
    Don't "Jagoda" and "Yagoda" sound the same?
    Well, if you know that you should apply the English pronunciation for the latter, yes.

    Slavic people ignorant of English would undoubtedly read Yagoda like ыагода. All in all, we have no reason not to use our phonetic transcription. Diphthongs and jers aside, a one-to-one correspondence between Russian and other Slavic languages can be achieved. Why would we write Yeltsin/Brezhnev/Ilyich when Jelcin/Brežněv/Iljič do the job much better?

    Jana
     

    Marijka

    Member
    Polish/Poland
    Jana337 said:
    Why would we write Yeltsin/Brezhnev/Ilyich when Jelcin/Brežněv/Iljič do the job much better?
    If I saw "Yeltsin", no doubt, I wouldn't know who is being talked about. Aren't there any international transcription rules?? I found that quite difficult and confusing, when I was writing my essay. I had serious problem with bibliography, I wrote it in cyrillic at last, but it was really tricky. Same problem, when you're searching library index.
     

    Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    Marijka said:
    If I saw "Yeltsin", no doubt, I wouldn't know who is being talked about. Aren't there any international transcription rules?? I found that quite difficult and confusing, when I was writing my essay. I had serious problem with bibliography, I wrote it in cyrillic at last, but it was really tricky. Same problem, when you're searching library index.
    A good way to deal with this is to find Jelcin in Wikipedia in Polish (where you are sure about the transcription) and then to click on whichever language version you wish. :)

    But this is quite off-topic. Please open a new thread if you have any comments or questions about transcription.

    Jana
     

    aries44

    Member
    English
    Just found this now.

    In yiddish we have Jagdas which is suppose to be strawberry in Polish.
    We have Malina which is suppose to be boysenberry in Russian.

    Now how do you get to Jagdas from Jagoda
     

    beclija

    Senior Member
    Boarisch, Österreich (Austria)
    I don't really know, but the -s makes it look a bit like it came from Lithuanian - anyone knows what strawberry is in Lithuanian?
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    In Serbian we have several fruit-names:
    Jagoda (strawberry), Višnja (sour cherry), Dunja (quince) and Nerandža (a variation of Narandža/Pomorandža (orange) - but rare and old-fashioned; I happen to know 2 persons with such a name but there are many who never heard of it).

    Maybe there are more, but these are all I can think of now...
     
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