All Slavic languages: mouse (feminine/masculine)

dihydrogen monoxide

Senior Member
Slovene, Serbo-Croat
Is the word mouse in your language feminine or masculine? I'd like to also hear from speakers of Sorbian if they are on this forum.
 
  • dihydrogen monoxide

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Serbo-Croat
    That's what I was getting at, I wanted to see if Serbo-Croatian was the only Slavic language where word mouse is not feminine and wanted to compare it with other Slavic languages, that's the basis of this topic.
     

    Kolan

    Banned
    Russian (CCCP)
    When did the masculine form die out?
    I am not able to testify :). However, some traces of мышец (which is not lexical in modern Russian, unless it is used in modern blogs literally or euphemistically like "мышец настал" or meaning computer mouse) could be seen in a family name like Мышецкий, or in its feminine equivalent мышца which acquired a different meaning (muscle, http://ru.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%BC%D1%83%D1%81%D0%BA%D1%83%D0%BB) long time ago.
     
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    dihydrogen monoxide

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Serbo-Croat
    That's the explanation I needed, however if you were to look at the meaning of the muscle and its cognates it means little mouse. Looks like Russian changed the gender for the word mouse to form muscle while other languages that I know of kept original gender.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Miš in Slovene is feminine.

    Funnily enough, in my gradmother's dialect -- she's from Bela Krajina (or Bela krajina as it's written in Slovene) --, it's masculine. That's almost certianly due to the influence of Croatian, since Bela Krajina borders Croatia and has historically been influenced by migration from Croatia and Bosnia during the Turkish invasions.

    But yes, in standard Slovene, miš is always feminine. Mišek is the (diminuitive) masculine form.
     
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    iobyo

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    In addition to BSC, "mačka" is also used in Slovene, Slovak, and possibly some other Slavic languages -- Macedonian perhaps?

    That's right. We also have the masculine form of мачор (mačor), something like the Serbian mačak, but the feminine form is used by default.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think Bulgarian has borrowed their word for cat ("котка") from Russian ("кот", "кошка").

    But... if I remember correctly, it may be from OCS, or even a reborrowing perhaps.

    Is the Hungarian macska from BSC or the other way around?

    Sorry for going off-topic.
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Actually, Macedonian has глушец.

    I believe we're the only ones not to use some form of the common Slavic миш ("miš").

    male: глушец (glušec) ['glu.ʃɛt͡s]; in some dialects глуфец (glufec) ['glu.fɛt͡s]
    female: глувчица (gluvčica) ['gluf.t͡ʃi.t͡sa]
    neuter and diminutive: глувче (gluvče) ['gluf.t͡ʃɛ]
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Also in modern Russian there is no masculine form.
    There is colloquial "мыш" (homophonous in the nominative case, but with the 2nd declension pattern instead of the 3rd: мыша́, мышу́, мыша́, мышо́м, мыше́). But it's marginal, of course.
    However, some traces of мышец (which is not lexical in modern Russian, unless it is used in modern blogs literally or euphemistically like "мышец настал" or meaning computer mouse) could be seen in a family name like Мышецкий, or in its feminine equivalent мышца which acquired a different meaning
    Мышца had its meaning already in proto-Slavic. Мышецкий may be not related to mice at all.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Czech myšice (f.) is a species of Muridae.

    myška (f.) is a diminutive of myš (f.), also an archaic word for muscle, musculus (= sval in Modern Czech, from the verb valiti);

    myška is also a species of Muridae (Rus. мышь-малютка);

    another species of Myomorpha (myšovci) is myšivka (f., Rus. мышовка);

    The complete "family" in stories for children: myšák (m.), myš/myška/myšice (f.), myšče (n. - gen. myščete, pl. myščata)

    "Šel myšák s myšicí a svými šesti myščaty do městečka Myškova na myší trh."

    In Czech (like in Polish) hlušec is a bird (hluchý = deaf; Rus. глухарь < глухо́й).

    myšok (m.) is a species of whale (Balaenopteridae), probably from an older Latin name Balaena musculus;
     
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    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Czech we have also a plant: hluchavka f. (Lamium, dead-nettle), from the adjective hluchý; it means that the plant doesn't sting like nettle. In BCS it is called mrtva kopriva, however it is not related to the true nettle (Cz. kopřiva = nettle).
     
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