All Slavic languages: Verbs of motion

Diaspora

Senior Member
USA
Serbocroatian, English
Instead of giving me examples of verbs of motion can someone actually explain them to me? They are very confusing in West/East Slavic languages.
Thanks
 
  • Jana337

    Senior Member
    čeština
    This is a very broad question. Could you give us some guidance as to what we should comment on specifically, please? :)
     

    texpert

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Instead of giving me examples of verbs of motion can someone actually explain them to me? They are very confusing in West/East Slavic languages.
    Thanks

    As an American, you should get the gist of the thing by comparing the going/go. Though arguably a different phenomenon, this distinction seems to fit with the given examples:

    хожу в школу - chodím do školy - I go to school (regularly)
    иду в школу - jdu do školy - I'm going to school (at the moment)
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    As an American, you should get the gist of the thing by comparing the going/go. Though arguably a different phenomenon, this distinction seems to fit with the given examples:

    хожу в школу - chodím do školy - I go to school (regularly)
    иду в школу - jdu do školy - I'm going to school (at the moment)

    But this isn't a specifically East/West Slavic feature, is it? :confused:

    Slovenian, a South Slavic language, has:

    Hodim v šolo. = I go to school (regularly).
    Grem v šolo. = I'm going to school (at the moment).

    However, I can't remember what BCS uses. Perhaps it's just BCS that doesn't have this distinction? :confused:
     
    Last edited:

    texpert

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Surely not. As I did not quite get the point of the question I simply followed the link provided by jazyk. One of the inputs in there explains that the BCS had ceased to distinguish between iterative/non-iterative verbs of motion.
     
    Last edited:

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Surely not. As I did not quite get the point of the question I simply followed the link provided by jazyk. One of the inputs in there explains that the BCS had ceised to distinguish between infinite/finite verbs of motion.

    I see. I was confused for a second because West/East Slavic languages were mentioned in the first post.
     

    Diaspora

    Senior Member
    USA
    Serbocroatian, English
    As an American, you should get the gist of the thing by comparing the going/go. Though arguably a different phenomenon, this distinction seems to fit with the given examples:

    хожу в школу - chodím do školy - I go to school (regularly)
    иду в школу - jdu do školy - I'm going to school (at the moment)


    Thank you that is very helpful. BCS does not make a distinction. But now I see it easily from an English-language perspective.
     
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