all sore

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi, there

I'd like to know if it is wrong to use "all" followed by an adjective. For example:

"If you skip the warm-up, you will get all sore the next day after you run"

Does it sound odd?

Thank you
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hi. "All sore" is possible, but it sounds a little odd to me. I'd rather see "sore" without "all" in that sentence.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Hi. "All sore" is possible, but it sounds a little odd to me. I'd rather see "sore" without "all" in that sentence.
    But if I want to add emphasis to the sentence? What could I say? "...you will get sore all over"?... or "your whole body will get sore"?... Does neither actually work?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    "All sore" actually sounds a little juvenile to me, GM. If you really need to specify the amount or extent of the soreness, then either of your latest options sounds better to me.

    Too many words in a simple remark can sound effusive. I'd rather see "sore" by itself, but you can add more, of course, if you think it will make your sentence more accurate or effective.
     
    Last edited:

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    "All sore" actually sounds a little juvenile to me, GM. If you really need to specify the amount or extent of the soreness, then either of your latest options sounds better to me.

    Too many words in a simple remark can sound effusive. I'd rather see "sore" by itself, but you can add more, of course, if you think it will make your sentence more accurate or effective.
    But if I said "If you skip the warm-up, you will get sore all over the next day after you run" or "If you skip the warm-up, your whole body will get sore the next day after you run", wouldn't you find them odd at all?
     
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