All that matters is betrayal!

Dr. JCVRD

Senior Member
Persian
Hi everybody.

I'm not sure how to translate the red part in sentence below in English so that it looks colloquially and natural to native eyes. Sorry, some versions might look SILLY but please let me know which one works better and if none of them is acceptable, I'd appreciate your extra hints and helps. Thank you in advance.

1) "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is a man of no joking when it comes to a matter of betrayal."

2) "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is a man of no joking when it comes to the matter of betrayal."

3) "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is a man of no joking when it comes to betrayal."

4) "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is a man of no joking when the matter comes to betrayal."

5) "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is a man of no joking when the betrayal comes to matter."
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Please explain the context in which you want to use the sentence. I don't understand what the intended meaning is.

    (And I know this isn't what you asked about but "a man of no joking" is not idiomatic.)
     

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Please explain the context in which you want to use the sentence. I don't understand what the intended meaning is.

    (And I know this isn't what you asked about but "a man of no joking" is not idiomatic.)
    OK. Here's a short version of what the conversation is about:

    Joe and Eric work for Frank. They are talking about a man who is killed as a result of betraying Frank. Joe says it wasn't necessary to kill him when he was already tortured so harshly. Eric says: "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is a man of no joking when it comes to a matter of betrayal." (or the other versions!).

    Eric actually means when someone betrays Frank, Frank only considers a death penalty for the traitor and not less. I hope it could illuminate the context.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    And you know Frank doesn't mess about when it comes to betrayal.


    (It looks like in AE this would probably be "mess around".)
     

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    And you know Frank doesn't mess about when it comes to betrayal.


    (It looks like in AE this would probably be "mess around".)
    Thank you. And what about this one? Does "dead serious" make sense? And may you please let me know if there's any other thing wrong in this sentence?

    "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is dead serious when it comes to betrayal."
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Does "dead serious" make sense?

    "Come on, Joe. This guy was a grungy thief. And you know Frank is dead serious when it comes to betrayal."
    Yes, "dead serious" works okay.

    But I'm also unsure what "grungy" means here. I imagine it's not vastly significant but is similar to saying e.g. "he was just a dirty little thief" (where the adjectives are not meant to be taken literally but are just for emphasis).
     

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I'm wondering what you mean by 'grungy'. Are you assuming that it links with 'betrayal'
    No, I don't assume it links with "betrayal". I wrote it to just indicate the humiliating language of the speaker. It could be "a thief" or "a grungy thief". You think there's any problem with it here?
     

    Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    There is a potential mix of registers- grungy is a very mild insult. Those in the business of summary justice might chose an expletive instead.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Please explain the context in which you want to use the sentence. I don't understand what the intended meaning is.

    (And I know this isn't what you asked about but "a man of no joking" is not idiomatic.)
    Nor is 'grungy thief' idiomatic. What is it supposed to mean?

    I totally share Barque's #2 puzzlement.
    First, do you mean you are translating something into English? Please tell us what language you are translating from.

    The word 'filthy' has many meanings both literal and long-standing slang, especially sexual; foremost to me, 'grungy' is modern slang with definite connotations, but not necessarily sexual. (To me, 'grunge' isn't at all sexual, but that might be my relative ignorance of an era after my prime.)
    ... do you have any words in mind instead?
    :confused:
    Perhaps hey presto's 'dirty little thief' is more meaningful in your context.
     
    Last edited:

    Dr. JCVRD

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Nor is 'grungy thief' idiomatic. What is it supposed to mean?

    I totally share Barque's #2 puzzlement.
    First, do you mean you are translating something into English? Please tell us what language you are translating from.

    The word 'filthy' has many meanings both literal and long-standing slang, especially sexual; foremost to me, 'grungy' is modern slang with definite connotations, but not necessarily sexual. (To me, 'grunge' isn't at all sexual, but that might be my relative ignorance of an era after my prime.)

    :confused:
    Perhaps hey presto's 'dirty little thief' is more meaningful in your context.
    Thank you for your help. And by the way, I'm translating from Farsi to English. Of course there's no Persian script in my hands. I'm just trying to translate a sentence in my head to English. And I don't necessarily mean to imply any sexual connotations. Instead I'm trying to show that the speaker is using a rude and humiliating language.
     
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