<All><the> countries have a national flag

< Previous | Next >

taraa

Senior Member
Persian
Hi
If I want to say every country has a national flag, which one of the following sentences will be correct?
1- countries have a national flag
2- all the countries have a national flag
3- all countries have a national flag
 
Last edited:
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Aall countries have a national flag.
    You don't need "the" here before "countries" though adding it wouldn't be wrong. But "All countries" works better; it implies "All countries in the world" or "All the countries of the world".
    All the students in the class did their your homeworks homework.
    Here, "all the students" refers to a specific group of students, those in the class and possibly for that reason, it sounds better with "the". You could say "All students in the class did their homework" but without context that doesn't sound as natural to me.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You don't need "the" here before "countries" though adding it wouldn't be wrong. But "All countries" works better; it implies "All countries in the world" or "All the countries of the world".
    What makes that different that you didn't use "the" for "All countries in the world" but you used "the" for "All the countries of the world"?
    Here, "all the students" refers to a specific group of students, those in the class and possibly for that reason, it sounds better with "the". You could say "All students in the class did their homework" but without context that doesn't sound as natural to me.
    When does "All students in the class did their homework" sound natural to you?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    What makes that different that you didn't use "the" for "All countries in the world" but you used "the" for "All the countries of the world"?
    The first phrase is the original. The second is the explanation, which naturally would be in more detail. All the countries of the world = All the countries tbhat exist in the world.
    When does "All students in the class did their homework" sound natural to you?
    We might be going off-topic here, but you might hear this in a context where someone seems doubtful if every single student did their homework, and someone else is saying emphatically that they all did. All students, without exception, did their homework. There could be better examples; I haven't spent too much time trying to think of one.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    All flowers here are beautiful. Does it means all of them without exception?
    All the flowers here are beautiful. Here maybe some of the flowers aren't beautiful?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    All countries have a national flag :tick: (perfectly clear, meaning every country has one)
    All the countries have a national flag :confused: (not clear, begging the question: which particular countries do you mean?)

    All students in the class did their homework. :tick:
    All the students in the class did their homework. :tick:
    (Both are quite clear – the class is specified so we know who is meant)

    All flowers here are beautiful. :tick:
    All the flowers here are beautiful. :tick:
    (Both are quite clear – it specifies the flowers that are “here”)
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    The article is required because of the word 'here'. You aren't saying anything about all flowers everwhere, just the specific ones in that place.
    Isn't it like "All students in the class" that we can omit "the"?
    All countries have a national flag :tick: (perfectly clear, meaning every country has one)
    All the countries have a national flag :confused: (not clear, begging the question: which particular countries do you mean?)

    All students in the class did their homework. :tick:
    All the students in the class did their homework. :tick:
    (Both are quite clear – the class is specified so we know who is meant)

    All flowers here are beautiful. :tick:
    All the flowers here are beautiful. :tick:
    (Both are quite clear – it specifies the flowers that are “here”)
    Doesn't it mean "some of flowers maybe aren't beautiful" like what Barque said?
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    All countries have a national flag :tick: (perfectly clear, meaning every country has one)
    All the countries have a national flag :confused: (not clear, begging the question: which particular countries do you mean?)

    All students in the class did their homework. :tick:
    All the students in the class did their homework. :tick:
    (Both are quite clear – the class is specified so we know who is meant)

    All flowers here are beautiful. :tick:
    All the flowers here are beautiful. :tick:
    (Both are quite clear – it specifies the flowers that are “here”)
    Sorry lingobingo, Hermione said "the" is required in "All flowers here are beautiful" and it should be "All the flowers here are beautiful". For you isn't "the" required? Is it optional?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    They could both work, depending on the context.

    A: This garden has beautiful flowers and beautiful plants. This other garden is different. It has beautiful flowers and some beautiful plants, and some ordinary-looking plants. And this third garden--it's different in a different way. All flowers here are beautiful, but the plants are all ugly.

    A: Show me a flower here that's just ordinary-looking, or even ugly.
    B: I can't. All the flowers here are beautiful.
     
    Last edited:

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    They could both work, depending on the context.

    A: This garden has beautiful, ordinary and ugly flowers. This other garden is different. It desn't have ugly flowers but some ordinary ones. And this third garden--it's our showpiece. All flowers here are beautiful.

    A: Show me a flower here that's just ordinary-looking, or even ugly.
    B: I can't. All the flowers here are beautiful.
    Hello Barque, and thank you so much :)
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    And "All the flowers..." could also work in my first example. I can't think of a situation where I'd only use "All flowers here are beautiful", and not "All the flowers here..."
     

    Henares

    Senior Member
    Polish
    They could both work, depending on the context.

    A: This garden has beautiful flowers and beautiful plants. This other garden is different. It has beautiful flowers and some beautiful plants, and some ordinary-looking plants. And this third garden--it's different in a different way. All flowers here are beautiful, but the plants are all ugly.

    A: Show me a flower here that's just ordinary-looking, or even ugly.
    B: I can't. All the flowers here are beautiful.
    Why “all flowers” works in the first example and does not in the second one?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Why does “all flowers” work works in the first example and does not in the second one?
    It works in the second too but "All the flowers..." just sounds more natural.

    As for why, that's how it works. Perhaps someone else will give you a more detailed explanation.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Sorry lingobingo, Hermione said "the" is required in "All flowers here are beautiful" and it should be "All the flowers here are beautiful". For you isn't "the" required? Is it optional?
    Yes, it’s optional. Certainly, with no further context, “All the flowers here are beautiful” is more idiomatic. But the definite article is not essential. Without it, you would accentuate “all” in speech.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Sign on a florist's market stall in the late afternoon:

    "All Flowers Half-Price."
    Thanks a lot!
    Yes, it’s optional. Certainly, with no further context, “All the flowers here are beautiful” is more idiomatic. But the definite article is not essential. Without it, you would accentuate “all” in speech.
    Thanks a lot!
    Sorry lingobingo, in the examples that Barque gave in post #19, can you please explain why "the" sound more natural in the second example?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Sorry lingobingo, in the examples that Barque gave in post #19, can you please explain why "the" sound more natural in the second example?
    A: Show me a flower here that's just ordinary-looking, or even ugly.
    B: I can't. All the flowers here are beautiful.
    All the flowers here are beautiful.
    The is justified because flowers is defined/restricted by here. They are a specified group of flowers taken from the totality of all flowers.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    That’s not for me to explain, since they’re not my examples. :)
    Oh sorry lingobingo, you are right. I asked since Barque said:
    As for why, that's how it works. Perhaps someone else will give you a more detailed explanation.
    All the flowers here are beautiful.
    The is justified because flowers is defined/restricted by here. They are a specified group of flowers taken from the totality of all flowers.
    Thanks a lot :)
    but here "all flowers" are restricted too:

    Sign on a florist's market stall in the late afternoon:

    "All Flowers Half-Price."
    Why isn't "the" required?
     
    Last edited:

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Why isn't "the" required?
    This is a sentence on a sign--it's meant to be short. It isn't a complete sentence. "All flowers" in this context means "All the flowers that are available here".

    It means: Whatever flower you choose, you'll get it at half-price. All (the) flowers available here can be purchased for half the usual price.

    I know it's confusing but I'm afraid this is the sort of thing you'll only pick up with constant practice. The good thing is that it is certainly possible.
     
    Last edited:

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    This is a sentence on a sign--it's meant to be short. It isn't a complete sentence. "All flowers" in this context means "All the flowers that are available here".

    It means: Whatever flower you choose, you'll get it at half-price. All (the) flowers available here can be purchased for half the usual price.

    I know it's confusing but I'm afraid this is the sort of thing you'll only pick up with constant practice. The good thing is that it is certainly possible.
    Thanks a lot, Barque. :)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top