all the rage

Tokyoite

Member
Japanese
Hi everyone,

I have recently learned the idiom "all the rage", which means "very popular" as you know.
I am just wondering if I can use it in everyday conversation, like "The movie is all the rage these days."
Or "all the rage" should be used only in written English?

TIA
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    It's used in conversation, but usually refers to an activity rather than, say, a movie. E.g:

    Late-night parties are all the rage.
    Drinking tequila is all the rage.
    Taking selfies on your mobile phone is all the rage...
     

    Tokyoite

    Member
    Japanese
    It's used in conversation, but usually refers to an activity rather than, say, a movie. E.g:

    Late-night parties are all the rage.
    Drinking tequila is all the rage.
    Taking selfies on your mobile phone is all the rage...
    Thank you, Keith-san!
    Your examples are so helpful.:)
     

    Wandering JJ

    Senior Member
    British English
    All the rage sounds very dated to me - from the 1950s perhaps.
    I don't think it's so much that the expression is dated, rather that it is usually used to describe something that was popular at some time in the past. For example, miniskirts for women were all the rage in the sixties; long hair for men was all the rage in the seventies.

    I don't find anything strange about Keith Bradford's contemporary examples either. I particularly like "Taking selfies on your mobile phone is all the rage these days."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top