All you have to do is buy/to buy a car

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
Due to a thread I have just seen in the forum I wanted to ask a qeustion:
"All you have to do is buy/to buy a car"
Does it make any difference if we write the sentence either with to or without.

Thanks.
 
  • JLanguage

    Senior Member
    USA: American English, Learning Hebrew and Spanish
    roniy said:
    Due to a thread I have just seen in the forum I wanted to ask a question:
    "All you have to do is buy/to buy a car"
    Does it make any difference if we you write the sentence either with to or without. (Impersonal third person plural in Hebrew translates informally as "you", and more formally as "one" or as the passive mood.)

    Thanks.

    To me it seems better without "to". "All you have to do is buy a car."
    -Jonathan.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    "All you have to do is buy a car" (to buy is ok here, but it sounds better to my ear without it).
    "You just/only/merely need to buy a car"
    "All you need is to buy a car"
    "All you need is a car"
    "All you require is a car"
     

    piraña utria

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombian with Caribbean nuanc
    Hi friends:

    I’d really appreciate if someone supports my comprehension about this topic, related also with this thread.

    This paragraph available online (http://www.voanews.com/english/2008-09-26-voa54.cfm) has been taken literally from its original text:

    The financial crisis grows out of problems with mortgages, which are loans from a bank that helps a borrower to buy a home.

    My doubt is related to the way as verb “to buy” is used in this context, because I’ve heard several times its respective podcast and it seems as if the speaker says either “buy a home” or “buying home” instead of “to buy a”.

    Are all of them right options in this case or just the first one?

    Regards,
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    In that case, you can either say, The financial crisis grows out of problems with mortgages, which are loans from a bank that help_ a borrower to buy a home.

    (I took the 's' from 'helps' because, in my understanding of the sentence, the loans, and not the bank, help a borrower to buy a home. Therefore the verb must agree with "loans" not with "bank". It should therefore be "loans help.")

    OR you can say,

    The financial crisis grows out of problems with mortgages, which are loans from a bank that help a borrower buy a home.

    Either sentence would be used in everyday speech, but the first sentence is slightly more formal with the use of the word 'to' before 'buy'.
     

    Nymeria

    Senior Member
    English - Barbadian/British/educated in US universities blend
    Due to a thread I have just seen in the forum I wanted to ask a qeustion:
    "All you have to do is buy/to buy a car"
    Does it make any difference if we write the sentence either with to or without.

    Thanks.

    I would not say, "All you have to do is to buy a car" because that looks like the infinitive form of the verb is being overused. "To do" is already present so why do you "to buy" as well?

    "All you have to do is buy car" is much better.
     

    piraña utria

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombian with Caribbean nuanc
    In that case, you can either say, The financial crisis grows out of problems with mortgages, which are loans from a bank that help_ a borrower to buy a home.

    (I took the 's' from 'helps' because, in my understanding of the sentence, the loans, and not the bank, help a borrower to buy a home. Therefore the verb must agree with "loans" not with "bank". It should therefore be "loans help.")

    OR you can say,

    The financial crisis grows out of problems with mortgages, which are loans from a bank that help a borrower buy a home.

    Either sentence would be used in everyday speech, but the first sentence is slightly more formal with the use of the word 'to' before 'buy'.

    Thanks a lof my friend. It's a simple and precise answer.

    Regards,
     
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