all your politeness for that crowd up in the tennis dance

Lunaya

Senior Member
French
Hi,

same play, another pb :
Noel is teasing his sister Eileen about her telling people what they should do, and he says
"There's Miss Manners for you. Do you call that politeness? Must keep all your politeness for that crowd up in the tennis dance"

I understand that he's giving her a nickname and reproaches her with being rude. But what about that reference to a crowd in a tennis dance? I don't have any clue...

thanks in avance!
 
  • indigospooky

    Senior Member
    English (UK)
    The tennis dance might refer to a dance that people who belong to the tennis club will go to (it has connotations of a rather posh set of people who play tennis together and have various social events). So he's saying that she can't be polite to him but probably behaves somewhat differently when she's with her posh tennis-playing friends (the implication being that she wants to impress them or be part of that set, so will behave better, be more polite etc). Does that make sense in the context of the play?
     

    Lunaya

    Senior Member
    French
    I see...well, that could be the meaning, since she has friends from work that we don't really know about, and she seems to stand out a bit from the rest of the family. Thank you!
     
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