Alla [allá] te espero.

PaulPablo

New Member
English
Just wondering what this means.

I saw it on an album cover and it says the meaning is "I'll wait for you there"

But then I heard of a TV show called alla te espero and it means "wait for me"

I just wondered which is more accurate.
 
  • Galván

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Just wondering what this means.

    I saw it on an album cover and it says the meaning is "I'll wait for you there"

    But then I heard of a TV show called "allá te espero" and it means "wait for me"

    I just wondered which is more accurate.
    I'll wait for you there
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I saw it on an album cover and it says the meaning is "I'll wait for you there"

    But then I heard of a TV show called allá te espero and it means "wait for me"

    More precisely, it means "I'll wait for you over there," which implies a greater distance away from the current location. Of course, depending on the context we might omit the "over," as in the case of saying you'll wait for someone in another city, etc. For a more proximal "there," we have the word ahí.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    But then I heard of a TV show called alla te espero and it means "wait for me"
    This is a possible translation, depending on the context, but I'm not sure where you got this idea. Maybe it would help if you gave us details about the TV show (when & where it's from, what the general premise is) and explain where you saw/heard that it means "wait for me."
     

    PamelaAD

    Member
    Spanish - Costa Rica
    Just wondering what this means.

    I saw it on an album cover and it says the meaning is "I'll wait for you there"

    But then I heard of a TV show called alla te espero and it means "wait for me"

    I just wondered which is more accurate.
    Both are acceptable depending on the context. The phrase "Allá te espero", in a literal way, could be translated as "I'll wait for you there", but as I mentioned before, depending on the context it could be adapted as "Wait for me".
     

    Magazine

    Senior Member
    Español-España.
    Both are acceptable depending on the context. The phrase "Allá te espero", in a literal way, could be translated as "I'll wait for you there", but as I mentioned before, depending on the context it could be adapted as "Wait for me".
    How would that be possible?

    Te espero = first person tells person 2 that he/she is going to wait for him or her.

    Wait for me: YOU have to wait for me
     

    PamelaAD

    Member
    Spanish - Costa Rica
    How would that be possible?

    Te espero = first person tells person 2 that he/she is going to wait for him or her.

    Wait for me: YOU have to wait for me

    When you translate a phrase it doesn't necessarily have to be in a literal way, sometimes the translator chooses to adapt it depending on many factors like the culture of the country or what could be easier to understand for the target audience and so on.

    For example, the name of the movie "White Chicks", literally it would be something like "Chicas blancas", but instead it was adapted as "¿Y dónde están las rubias?" based on the context of the movie.
     

    franzjekill

    Mod E/S
    Español rioplatense
    but as I mentioned before, depending on the context it could be adapted as "Wait for me".
    "... as I mentioned before" ¿dónde? En este tema no hay ningún comentario previo tuyo.

    For example, the name of the movie "White Chicks", literally it would be something like "Chicas blancas", but instead it was adapted as "¿Y dónde están las rubias?" based on the context of the movie.
    ¿Qué tiene que ver el tema de los nombres que les ponen a las películas por motivos comerciales con traducir una simplísima frase como la propuesta? "Allá te espero" no significa de ningún modo "Wait for me", ni con toda la imaginación de todos los libretistas de Hollywood.
     

    Lyrica_Soundbite

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    Just wondering what this means.

    I saw it on an album cover and it says the meaning is "I'll wait for you there"

    But then I heard of a TV show called alla te espero and it means "wait for me"

    I just wondered which is more accurate.

    The first one.
    I've looked up "Allá te espero (Wait for me)" and it's a Colombian telenovela. I think "wait for me" sounds more romantic than "I'll wait for you over there", so it's a good title for a telenovela.
    "Wait for me" is NOT an accurate translation, I'll go with Magazine's explanation in #6 about that.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    The phrase "Allá te espero", in a literal way, could be translated as "I'll wait for you there", but as I mentioned before, depending on the context it could be adapted as "Wait for me".

    "Allá te espero" can NEVER be translated as "Wait for me." Of course, TV show and movie producers can use whatever name they want when localizing a product for a foreign audience, but that is not translation. It is simply using a different title in the foreign language.

    I saw it on an album cover and it says the meaning is "I'll wait for you there"
    Correct.
    But then I heard of a TV show called alla te espero and it means "wait for me"
    It does not "mean" that. They simply gave the show a different title in English, for reasons known only to them.
     
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