aller bien

  • Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    Tu ne vas pas bien. = You are not doing well.

    Tu n'es pas bien ici. = You don't enjoy being here.
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    It would probably give the same message, although "Tu ne t'amuses pas bien" is "You are not having fun". You could just as easily say for "Tu n'es pas bien ici", "You are not comfortable here".

    N. :)
     

    Agnès E.

    Senior Member
    France, French
    xanana said:
    This is what I read in a children's novel:

    Shouldn't that be: "Tu ne vas pas bien, ici ?"

    Merci,

    X
    Hello !

    Tu ne vas pas bien : are you feeling sick ?
    Tu n'es pas bien : aren't you comfortable ?
    It is actually verbal language, not written language, as there might be otherwise an inversion between verb and subject in the question.
    So, the child wrote well, as it is a dialog that you could hear anywhere. ;)
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    I feel I have to mention another use of "tu n'es pas bien", even though it is very colloquial:

    "(Non mais) t'es pas bien (dans ta tête) ? = are you crazy?
    Literally = are you not well (in your head)?

    Exemple :
    Sortir en chemise alors qu'il neige! T'es pas bien ? :eek:

    We also use "ça (ne) va pas (la tête) ?"
    to question (albeit rhetorically) the mental balance of the person we're addressing.;)

    I don't know if those are France French expressions or if other French-speaking countries use them as well.
     

    Gil

    Senior Member
    Français, Canada
    egueule said:
    I feel I have to mention another use of "tu n'es pas bien", even though it is very colloquial:

    "(Non mais) t'es pas bien (dans ta tête) ? = are you crazy?
    Literally = are you not well (in your head)?

    Exemple :
    Sortir en chemise alors qu'il neige! T'es pas bien ? :eek:

    We also use "ça (ne) va pas (la tête) ?"
    to question (albeit rhetorically) the mental balance of the person we're addressing.;)

    I don't know if those are France French expressions or if other French-speaking countries use them as well.
    We don't need them:D
     
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