Alliss retired from golf in 1969 and went on to become a successful broadcaster.

Curiosity777

Senior Member
Korean
Alliss retired from golf in 1969 and went on to become a successful broadcaster.

I have no idea how to interpret this sentence.

Does this sentence mean Allis became a successful broadcaster? or can't we know whether Allis became a successful broadcaster without further context?

So, what does that sentence mean?

1. Alliss retired from golf in 1969 and became a successful broadcaster.

2. Alliss retired from golf in 1969 in order to become a successful broadcaster.

3. Either 1 or 2 according to context
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Alliss retired from golf in 1969 and went on to become a successful broadcaster.
    =
    Alliss retired from golf in 1969 and after that became a successful broadcaster.


    It’s very common to talk of someone “going on” to do something, but it really only means that that was their next step, the next thing they did.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    People generally retire from a sporting career based on becoming too old to compete (or losing their motivation to do so). That's the standard background. Once they've retried, that's when they start moving into a second career. But one doesn't usually cause the other. "Went on" means the second career happened after a period of time passed.
     

    Curiosity777

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Can the sentence mean 2 in this sentence?

    Allis retired from golf in 1969 and went on to become a successful broadcaster, but for some unknown reason, Alliss failed to be a successful broadcaster.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :confused: That’s not true at all, since he was a famous sports broadcaster for many years.

    Your sentence 2 (grammatically correct but also not entirely true)

    2. Alliss retired from golf in 1969 in order to become a successful broadcaster
    means: Alliss retired from golf in 1969 so that he could become a successful broadcaster
     

    Curiosity777

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Does that sentence mean the same thing even if "on" is removed as in "Allis retired from golf in 1969 and went to become a successful broadcaster"
     

    Curiosity777

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Unlike the original sentence, doesn't this sentence sound ambiguous?

    After Jane quit her job as a receptionist, she went on to earn her college degree.

    What does this sentence mean?

    1. After Jane quit her job as a receptionist, she earned her college degree.

    2. After Jane quit her job as a receptionist, she went on in order to college degree. (We don't know whether Jane eanred the college degree or not)

    3. Either 1 or 2 according to context.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It’s not ambiguous at all. It clearly states that earning her degree is what she went on to do (= went on and did).

    It’s very common, when itemising a sequence of events, to say that someone or something did/was A, then progressed by going on to do/become B.


    Doing one thing in order to do something else (so as to facilitate another action) is an entirely different concept. It is NOT what going on to do something means.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    After Jane quit her job as a receptionist, she went on to earn her college degree.
    It means Jane earned her college degree. The first thing she did was quit her job. The second thing she did was earn her college degree.

    "Went on to" refers to her next accomplishment in life.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top