allowed the cat to run away

azz

Senior Member
armenian
Are the following sentences grammatically correct?

a. The lights were on and the curtains were drawn back, which allowed the neighbors to see me dancing.

b. The cat was frisky and John forgot to close the window when he left, which allowed the cat to run away.


In (a) the combination of the two facts allowed the neighbors to see me dancing.
In (b) the only the second fact (John's forgetting to close the window) allowed the cat to run away.

Many thanks.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, they are both correct. You differentiate the meaning in the two sentences. In fact, sentence b) also implies that because the cat was feeling frisky and John left the door open, the cat ran away. If the cat had NOT been frisky it might have stayed asleep in the house even when John left the window open. The two situations were necessary for the cat to run away.
     

    azz

    Senior Member
    armenian
    Thank you so much Chez.

    I see what you mean, but I think the cat's friskiness can make the cat run away, but it doesn't really allow the cat to run away.
    At the end of the day, it all boils down to the same thing though. I don't seem to find an example where the first clause is totally dissociated from the phrase at the end! And that is to some extent logical. Why would one construct a sentence like that? It won't be natural.

    Many thanks.
     
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