allows for performativity on behalf of the viewer

Blue Apple

Senior Member
Persian (Iran)
does "allows for performativity on behalf of the viewer" mean "allows the viewers to be performative"? And does the following "participation" also imply"the viewers' participation"?

Text:
Text: Although first identified by Claude Levi-Strauss as a life strategy for low-tech societies which depend on the ad hoc use of the ‘means at hand’ for their day-to-day tasks, it was Jacques Derrida who spotted the potential that bricolage has as a postmodern strategy which lends itself to openness and playfulness in language. Moreover, there is a strong sense of play and indeterminacy in the production of an open text that allows for performativity on behalf of the viewer and provides the opportunity for active participation in the construction of meaning (Art and Advertising by Joan Gibbons).
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Yes, you've guessed correctly. Both are superfluously verbose paraphrastic terms to imbue this style of socio-philosophy with a spurious portentiousness. As we would say in plain English:

    Also, there is a strong sense of play and indeterminacy in the production of an open text that allows the viewer to play his part and to participate in constructing meaning.

    Thus rephrased, we see that the author is also repeating herself.
     

    Blue Apple

    Senior Member
    Persian (Iran)
    Yes, you've guessed correctly. Both are superfluously verbose paraphrastic terms to imbue this style of socio-philosophy with a spurious portentiousness. As we would say in plain English:

    Also, there is a strong sense of play and indeterminacy in the production of an open text that allows the viewer to play his part and to participate in constructing meaning.

    Thus rephrased, we see that the author is also repeating herself.
    Thanks a lot :thumbsup:
     
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