allows to monitor the targets and (to) detect possible threats [repeat 'to'?]

< Previous | Next >

yaaa

Member
italian
Hello,
If I have a list of infinitive verbs shall I repeat the "to" preposition ? Example:
"The system previously described allows to monitor the targets and (to) detect possible threats"

Thank you
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    In general the answer is no, you don't have to repeat the "to".

    However, your sentence doesn't seem quite right to me. The easiest way to put it right would be to put a pronoun in there:

    Allows us to ...
    Allows you to ...

    If that is not a suitable fix for you then you need to re-write it a different way, but it does not work as you have written it.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    All vVerbs, except auxiliary verbs (must, can, etcetera), have an infinitive. Am I missing something here?

    I think the point is that in other languages you don't need to use "to". In German it's "gehen", not "zu gehen". In Spanish it's "corrrer" I think.
     
    Last edited:

    yaaa

    Member
    italian
    In general the answer is no, you don't have to repeat the "to".

    However, your sentence doesn't seem quite right to me. The easiest way to put it right would be to put a pronoun in there:

    Allows us to ...
    Allows you to ...

    If that is not a suitable fix for you then you need to re-write it a different way, but it does not work as you have written it.
    thank you ... so you mean that "allows" always need an explicit object (me, you, the dog, Carl, them) ? In Italian there's a very similar construction where you can omit the object ( and in that case it makes reference to generic people/anybody )
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In this construction, 'allows' requires a subject.

    If we want to make a general statement, we can use the gerund/-ing form.

    "The system previously described allows monitoring (of) the targets and detecting possible threats"

    (I would use 'of' with the gerund in this sentence.)​

    If you want to use this construction, I would prefer 'permit.'

    "The system previously described permits monitoring (of) the targets and detecting possible threats"


    Added: These previous threads may be helpful. You are welcome to add a question or comment to any existing thread. :)

     
    Last edited:

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    No I am not saying anything about "always" I am talking about your specific sentence . It is not grammatical

    We can use "allow" with the object. But your sentence is not one of these contexts.

    As I said if adding a pronoun won't work you could re-write it in other ways

    "The system previously described allows to monitor the targets and (to) detect possible threats"
    The system allows for monitoring the targets and detecting possible threats.

    Edit to say: cross-posted with identical advice. Phew!! :D
     

    yaaa

    Member
    italian
    ok, so:
    "The method X allows us to implement [sth]..."
    "The method X allows implementing [sth]..."


    but if I were to use "allowing" with no specific object ?
    I would say
    "The method X has the advantage of allowing for the implementation of [sth]..."

    would
    "The method X has the advantage of allowing implementing [sth]..."
    be fine ?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ok, so:
    "The method X allows us to implement [sth]..."
    "The method X allows implementing [sth]..."
    However, there should be no article "The" before "Method." The first sentence should read "Method X allows us to implement [something] ..."

    The reason is that the noun "method" already has a determiner: its name, X. It does not need another one. Similarly, we could say "the President" or "President Obama," but in most contexts we would not say "The President Obama."

    Separately, while dictionaries often use abbreviations such as "sth" to save space (if a dictionary has 60,000 entries, this space can be important) they are hardly ever used by native speakers anywhere else. It would be best to forget them, or use them only in text messages.
     

    yaaa

    Member
    italian
    I don't say that the others are incorrect, but I prefer this one by far.
    I need to re-open this discussion since I've just found out that the form "allow for" actually means "to take into consideration" more than "to permit" .... So I wonder whether my previous sentence:

    "The method X has the advantage of allowing for the implementation of [<something>]..."

    , which was considered good by Cagey, actually means that by applying the method X I manage to implement some tool/technique.

    Thank you


    < Edited to write out dictionary abbreviation in full. Cagey, moderator >
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top